Julie Belanger

Portrait/Headshot: Julie Bélanger, Analyst(TALIS) EDU, OECD.
Research Leader
Cambridge Office

Education

Ph.D. in psychology, University of British Columbia; M.A. in psychology, University of British Columbia; B.A. in psychology and linguistics, McGill University

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact RAND Europe Media Relations at +44 (1223) 353 329, x2560, or email europeanmedia@rand.org.

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Overview

Julie Bélanger is a research leader at RAND Europe in the fields of education and social policy. Her responsibilities include providing leadership for research projects ranging from early childhood education and care to higher education.

She is a core member of the international consortium which has been selected to implement the OECD Starting Strong Survey in 10 countries (Early Years centre staff survey). She is also involved with a number of randomized controlled trials of educational interventions in primary and secondary schools in the UK (funded by Education Endowment Foundation) and is involved in research looking into the factors associated with teacher shortages.

Prior to joining RAND Europe, she worked as an analyst at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) where she was responsible for the development and implementation of Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS 2013), a large scale teacher and school leader survey which was implemented in 34 countries. Before this, she was a senior researcher at the Canadian Council on Learning where she worked with provincial governments on educational issues such as large-scale school reforms. Bélanger holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in developmental psychology from the University of British Columbia (Canada) and a B.A. in psychology and linguistics from McGill University (Canada).

Her main research interests include education research and policy in international and local contexts as well as issues surrounding early childhood education and care.

Recent Projects

  • Starting Strong Survey
  • Randomized control trial of Accelerated Reader
  • Randmoized control trial of Digital Feedback
  • Randomized control trial of MITA
  • Attracting and retaining teachers in Cambridgeshire

Selected Publications

Austin, B., Adesope, O. O., French, B. F., Gotch, C., Bélanger, J., Kubacka, K., "Examining school context and its influence on teachers: Linking TALIS 2013 with PISA 2012 student data," OECD Education Working Papers, (115), 2015

Moriconi, G. M. & Bélanger, J., "Student behaviour and use of class time in Brazil, Chile and Mexico: Evidence from TALIS 2013," OECD Education Working Papers, (112), 2015

Moriconi, G. M. & Bélanger, J., "Supporting teachers and schools to promote positive student behaviour in England and Ontario (Canada): Lessons for Latin America," OECD Education Working Papers, (116), 2015

OECD (Bélanger, J., Kubacka, K., Normandeau, S., Overduin, M. and Weatherby, K.), New Insights from TALIS 2013: Teaching and Learning in Primary and Upper Secondary Education, OECD Publishing, 2014

Alvarez-Galvan, J. L., Bélanger,. J., Bloem, S., Macready, C., Milovanovitch, Reviews of National Policies for Education: Secondary Education in Kazakhstan, OECD Publishing, 2014

Adesope, O. O., Austin, B., Bélanger, J. et al., TALIS 2013 Results: An International Perspective on Teaching and Learning. OECD Publishing, OECD Publishing, 2014

Hall, D. G., Williams, S., Bélanger, J., "Learning count nouns and adjectives: Understanding the contributions of lexical form class and social-pragmatic cues," Journal of Cognition and Development, 11(1):86-120, 2010

Bélanger, J. & Hall, D. G., "Learning proper names and count nouns: Evidence from 16- and 20-month-olds," Journal of Cognition and Development, 7:45-72, 2006

Commentary

  • Two students working together in a chemistry class

    Cambridgeshire Is at the Heart of England's Teacher Shortage Problem

    Teacher shortages could be a real threat in Cambridgeshire, unless larger numbers of secondary school teachers are attracted and retained. There are simply too few new teachers replacing those who retire, with this gap being even more pronounced in STEM subjects.

    Mar 21, 2017 Education Media Centre

Publications