Joshua Mendelsohn

joshua mendelsohn, m1091, joshua mendelsohn, m1091
Computational Sociologist
Santa Monica Office

Education

Ph.D. in sociology, Duke University

Overview

Joshua Mendelsohn is a computational sociologist at the RAND Corporation. Part social scientist, part data scientist, part programmer, Mendelsohn specializes in using computational methods to turn complex data into actionable insights. Popular methods in his toolkit include data visualization, geographic analysis (GIS), network analysis (SNA), text mining, and computational modeling. As a data/methods oriented researcher, his projects tend to vary widely in topic, but politics and health research accounts for the majority in recent years. Mendelsohn earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Duke University.

Research Focus

Commentary

  • Binary code bursts from phones held by a crowd of people with an overlay of glowing electronic numbers

    What Is the Adversary Likely to Do with the Clearance Records for 20 Million Americans?

    The state actor that hacked the Office of Personnel Management could use the stolen information to further its domestic control against dissidents, enhance its foreign intelligence, and improve its position in the global military and economic order.

    Jan 20, 2017 Inside Sources

  • Stickers are displayed at a polling station for the Wisconsin presidential primary election in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 5, 2016

    The Latest from the RAND Presidential Election Panel Survey

    RAND's panel survey examines voter attitudes, intentions, and choices, and how these change throughout the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Some sizeable shifts in positions occurred in survey results from December to March.

    Apr 7, 2016 The RAND Blog

  • Elissa Wenthe (C) holds her 4-month-old son as she listens to U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders speak at Upper Iowa University in Fayette, Iowa, January 24, 2016

    RAND Kicks Off 2016 Presidential Election Panel Survey

    RAND's panel survey examines voter attitudes, intentions, and choices, and how these change throughout the 2016 U.S. presidential election. What sets this effort apart from public opinion surveys and political polls is that it surveys the same people over the course of the election.

    Jan 27, 2016 The RAND Blog

Publications