Carl Rhodes

Photo of Carl Rhodes
Director, Force Modernization and Employment Program, RAND Project AIR FORCE
Santa Monica Office

Education

Ph.D. and M.S. in chemical engineering, California Institute of Technology; B.S. in chemical engineering, Stanford University

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Carl Rhodes is director of the Force Modernization and Employment Program within RAND Project AIR FORCE. This program examines the modernization and employment of combat systems, uninhabited aircraft, mobility assets, ISR systems, space capabilities, and cyber systems. During his tenure at RAND, Rhodes has performed work for clients including the Air Force, Army, Joint Staff, and Joint Forces Command. He participated in projects examining the interdiction of armored ground forces; long-range strike; and the military use of commercial space services and assets. He recently led projects examining current and future USAF intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities and the processes involved with planning, executing, and assessing those operations. Other recent research focuses on the employment and modernization of unmanned aircraft systems.

Rhodes received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, where his thesis work examined the modeling of nonlinear systems for process control.

Previous Positions

Associate Director, Aerospace Force Development Program, RAND Project AIR FORCE

Recent Projects

  • Future capabilities and missions for remotely pilot aircraft
  • Employing future surveillance assets to engage mobile targets
  • Tasking and employing intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets
  • Long-range strike capabilities required by the national security strategy

Selected Publications

Carl Rhodes et. al, A Strategies-to-Tasks Framework for Planning and Executing Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations, RAND Corporation (TR-434-AF), 2007

Sherrill Lingel et. al, Methodology for Improving the Planning, Execution, and Assessment of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Operations., RAND Corporation (TR-459-AF), 2007

John Matsumura et. al, Exploring Advanced Technologies for the Future Combat Systems Program, RAND Corporation (MR-1332-A), 2002

Tim Bonds et. al, Employing Commercial Satellite Communications: Wideband Investment Options for the Department of Defense, RAND Corporation (MR-1192-AF), 2000

Commentary

  • A pro-Russian separatist at the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 in Ukraine's Donetsk region, July 17, 2014

    3 Weapons That Threaten Commercial Planes

    It's relatively rare that commercial aircraft are targeted with weapons built primarily to attack military aircraft, but there are a range of potential threats from such weapons. Given that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was reportedly at 33,000 feet when contact was lost, it seems impossible that the attack could have occurred using a shoulder-fired missile.

    Jul 18, 2014 | U.S. News & World Report

Publications