Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik

Photo of Mahlet Woldetsadik
Assistant Policy Analyst
Santa Monica Office

Education

M.P.H. in public health, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Santé Publique; B.S. in chemistry, Converse College; B.A. in mathematics, Converse College

Overview

Mahlet Atakilt Woldetsadik is a Ph.D. candidate at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and an assistant policy analyst at RAND. She has an M.P.H. from École des Hautes Etudes en Santé Publique, where she was also a health policy research fellow. While in Paris, she worked on various health projects including studies that assessed the impact of national smoke-free policies on the incidence of myocardial infarction, and the burden of cerebrovascular diseases and mental health disorders in the EU27 region.

Prior to joining PRGS, she was a Young Champion Fellow with the Maternal Health Task Force at the Harvard School of Public Health where she designed a study that explored women's experiences with modern contraceptives and interpersonal violence prior to induced abortions. She has also worked at UN Women in Addis Ababa, where she led a project that studied the provision of medico-legal services to survivors of sexual violence. She graduated magna cum laude from Converse College with a B.A. and B.S. in mathematics and chemistry. She speaks English, Amharic, French, and Somali. Her policy interests include health, crime and violence, and international law.

Commentary

  • Youth leaders for the NGO Jatan Sansthan's youth program

    Women's Menstrual Hygiene in India: The Health and Environmental Implications

    According to India's 2011 census, 89 percent of the nation's rural population lives in households that lack toilets. This absence of proper sanitation presents public health challenges and affects Indian women disproportionately.

    Aug 22, 2014 | The RAND Blog

  • Congolese woman

    First Steps Toward Addressing DR Congo's Rape Crisis

    An effort to address atrocities against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo has fallen short of advocates' hopes for justice. With its focus on criminal prosecution, the strategy failed to consider the weak infrastructure of the judicial system, left victims' needs unmet, and did little to address prevention.

    Jun 11, 2014 | The RAND Blog