RAND Army Research Division

Latest Research

  • Inventory Reduction Without Regret: Balancing Storage and Rebuy Costs

    Jun 17, 2015

    The Army's parts inventory is seen by some as a source of waste, but disposing of too much inventory can increase long-term costs. The Army should assess the cost of inventory not on its total dollar value but instead on factors such as storage costs, repair costs, and the risk of rebuy.

  • A Framework to Assess the U.S. Global Defense Posture

    Jun 1, 2015

    Changes to Army global positioning depend on the need for greater robustness, faster responsiveness, or deepening a critical security and defense relationship in a given region. A RAND-developed framework may be useful in helping combatant commands plan and assess trade-offs in making these decisions.

  • Comparing U.S. Army Systems with Foreign Counterparts

    May 13, 2015

    To address possible capability gaps in its systems, the U.S. Army should examine options for countering long-range rockets, support research and development in robotics, consider approaches to lighten the loads for infantrymen, and examine the need for a new specialized manned reconnaissance aircraft.

Latest Commentary

  • Research Drives Ongoing Support for Veterans

    Nov 10, 2014

    On November 11, we honor the service and sacrifices of America's veterans. But as they return home and adjust to civilian life, veterans and their families face new challenges and communities struggle to meet their unique needs. Rigorous research is essential to addressing these challenges and finding long-term solutions. RAND explores key issues concerning veterans such as employment, health and well-being, family support, and education.

  • Defeating the Islamic State: Crafting a Regional Approach

    Jul 22, 2014

    While ISIL may achieve temporary tactical gains from declaring the caliphate, it made the strategic error of declaring all other Sunni political actors illegitimate. This may provide an opening to build a coalition that can create and implement a regional strategy to attack ISIL.

  • Rethinking U.S. Force Planning

    May 16, 2014

    While the renewed interest in crisis response forces by the military services is welcome in these times of uncertainty, forces that are permanently assigned to a geographic combatant command and based in a region continue to offer distinct benefits. RAND research has shown that an overseas presence enhances contingency responsiveness in most cases.