Solutions

National Security

  • Getting to Know Military Caregivers and Their Needs

    There are millions of military caregivers—wives, husbands, siblings, parents, and friends—caring for U.S. service members and veterans who are wounded, ill, or injured. These caregivers help their loved ones live better-quality lives, but their own needs may go unmet.

  • Lightening Body Armor

    Soldiers serving in Afghanistan regularly marched carrying more than 100 pounds of arms and equipment. Approximately one third of that burden is body armor. How can the weight of body armor be reduced without risking the lives of the soldiers it protects?

  • Dispersing War Reserve Materiel

    Prepositioning of war reserve materiel is essential to rapid deployment of U.S. forces, but the existing centralized storage posture is not well suited to unpredictable deployments. Would dispersed storage be a better option?

  • Addressing the Invisible Wounds of War

    Before 2007, little was known about how the availability of behavioral health services compared with the need among returning troops—or about the consequences to the nation if these needs were not met.

  • Replacing the C-130E

    The C-130 fleet performs critical air mobility functions for the nation, but part of that fleet is at risk from age-related factors. Which alternative aircraft would provide the required performance at lowest cost?

  • Managing Escalation in Crisis and War

    The risks of military escalation are more diverse today than during the Cold War. What steps can policymakers take to help prevent escalation in military confrontations and wars?

  • Measuring Troop Deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan

    How "big" were the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan? To prepare for future conflicts, the U.S. Army needed to know exactly how far it extended itself in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF).