Featured Research

  • Assessing the Value of Mounted Police Units in the UK

    Nov 19, 2014

    Research in the UK shows demonstrable and measurable value of mounted police in various deployment scenarios, but the decision to maintain, expand or cut mounted capacity must be based on the priorities a police force sets within limited and contracting budgets.

  • When Jihadis Come Marching Home

    Nov 18, 2014

    Although the numbers of Westerners slipping off to join the jihadist fronts in Syria and Iraq are murky, U.S. counterterrorism officials believe that those fighters pose a clear and present danger to American security.

  • Improving Family Engagement in Early Childhood Education Through Technology

    Nov 17, 2014

    Technology may afford new opportunities to improve early childhood education outcomes by empowering families to become better educators at home, and strengthening the connection and communication between school and home.

  • Countering ISIL's Financing

    Nov 13, 2014

    Stolen oil, extortion revenue, and access to international financial systems have enabled ISIL to build wealth. Helping Iraq and regional partners target financial facilitators and local revenue sources can reverse ISIL funding.

  • Community-Based Mental Health Providers Need More Preparation to Better Care for Veterans

    Nov 12, 2014

    Most community-based mental health providers are not well prepared to take care of the special needs of military veterans and their families. A national survey found that few providers met criteria for military cultural competency or used evidence-based approaches to treat problems commonly seen among veterans.

  • Military Retirement Compensation System Can Be Improved to Cut Costs and Improve Equity

    Nov 12, 2014

    The U.S. Department of Defense can change its retirement system in ways that will save between $1.8 and $4.4 billion a year, while extending benefits to more veterans and maintaining its attraction as a recruiting tool.

  • Tool Created to Help Multinational Companies Assess Risk of Bribery When Doing Business in Foreign Countries

    Nov 11, 2014

    Corruption can hinder global business investment — particularly in emerging markets — but multinational companies often have difficulty assessing the business bribery risk in other countries. A new tool, called the TRACE Matrix, can help.

  • Military Veteran Employment Valued, but Challenges Still Need to Be Addressed

    Nov 10, 2014

    Businesses report that U.S. military veterans make excellent employees, but companies still experience challenges locating and hiring them, including continuing difficulty understanding the match between military skills and civilian job requirements.

  • Measuring Hard-to-Measure Student Competencies

    Nov 3, 2014

    Interpersonal and intrapersonal competencies such as communication and resilience are important predictors of success and civic engagement after high school but they are difficult to measure. Practical, high-quality measures could help educators and policymakers improve outcomes for students.

  • Biosimilar Medications Could Create Billions in Health Care Savings

    Nov 3, 2014

    Introducing competing “biosimilar” versions of complex biologic drugs used to treat illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis could cut spending on biologics in the United States by $44 billion over the next decade.

  • Early Childhood Educators and Technology

    Nov 3, 2014

    Early childhood education (ECE) providers are in a position to help ensure that technology is used effectively. While there are obstacles, there are also courses of action that might be helpful in creating ECE providers who can ensure appropriate, intentional, and productive use of technology among young kids.

  • Drivers of Long-Term Insecurity and Instability in Pakistan

    Oct 30, 2014

    Already one of the most urbanized nations in South Asia, Pakistan is projected to have a majority of its population living in cities within three decades. Researchers examine Pakistan's increasing urbanization as a potential driver of long-term insecurity and instability, with particular attention to the cities of Karachi, Lahore, and Quetta.

  • Cost of Informal Caregiving for U.S. Elderly Is $522 Billion Annually

    Oct 27, 2014

    The price tag for informal caregiving of elderly people by friends and relatives in the U.S. comes to $522 billion a year. Replacing that care with unskilled paid care at minimum wage would cost $221 billion, while replacing it with skilled nursing care would cost $642 billion.

  • Saving the Government Money: Examples from RAND's FFRDCs

    Oct 27, 2014

    RAND's three federally funded research and development centers apply research capital they have developed over the years to help decisionmakers solve problems and often save money as well. This publication lists and briefly summarizes some RAND projects undertaken over the past ten years that have helped save the government money or that have identified ways to do so.

  • Alternative Futures for Syria

    Oct 22, 2014

    A December 2013 workshop evaluated possible outcomes from the Syrian civil war, but the period through August 2014 brought many changes. A reassessment of the workshop's findings shows that while a regime victory now appears to be likely, it would not be as big of a blow to ISIS due to the group's territorial gains in Iraq.

  • Lack of Complete European Integration Costs Countries, EU

    Oct 21, 2014

    The removal of existing barriers to foreign direct direct investment and non-tariff trade barriers within the European Union could boost total intra-EU merchandise exports up to 7 per cent in the long-term. These effects would vary by Member State, and by sector of the internal market.

  • Eliminating Subsidies for People to Buy Health Coverage Would Increase Premiums and Number of Uninsured

    Oct 21, 2014

    Eliminating subsidies that help low- and moderate-income people purchase coverage through government-run health insurance marketplaces would boost costs for consumers as much as 43 percent and cause more than 11 million Americans to lose their health insurance.

  • Identifying an Adequate Technology Infrastructure for Early Childhood Education

    Oct 20, 2014

    Infrastructure (devices, software, and connectivity) should support technology's potential to improve learning and build digital literacy among young kids. But many factors make “adequate infrastructure” a moving target, such as the myriad of choices on the market.

  • What Can the U.S. Army Learn from France's War in Mali?

    Oct 17, 2014

    French Army operations in Mali provide an example of how a technologically sophisticated army organizes and fields an expeditionary force. While the French way of war may not be optimal for U.S. commanders, who have greater resources at their disposal, the Army should still examine it for useful insights.

  • Making It More Difficult to Sue Physicians for Malpractice May Not Reduce 'Defensive Medicine'

    Oct 15, 2014

    Malpractice reform has been advocated by many experts as a key to reining in health care costs. Three states raised the standard for malpractice in the emergency room to gross negligence, but that did not translate into less-expensive care.