June 2004 RAND Health Newsletter

Contents of June 2004 Health newsletter:

  1. Social marketing of condoms is great, but we need more free condoms
  2. Providing better protection to emergency responders
  3. The societal promise of improving care for depression
  4. Reporting about health care quality: A guide to the galaxy
  5. Do sociodemographic differences matter for Hispanic patients who are HIV infected?
  6. Continuity of care for children
  7. News about RAND Health


  1. Social marketing of condoms is great, but we need more free condoms
    This commentary calls for the distribution of free condoms in the countries most severely affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The entire article is available at the link below, but you will need to register with Lancet to get free access.

    Citation: Social marketing of condoms is great, but we need more free condoms, Cohen DA, Farley, AT, The Lancet, Vol. 364, Number 9428, July 3, 2004, full article.

    More on HIV, STDs, and sexual behavior

  2. Providing better protection to emergency responders
    A major emergency-such as a hurricane or a terrorist attack-draws responders from many agencies, each with its own worker protection standards. A new study shows how improved coordination would save time during an emergency and assure a high level of protection for all responders.
    Citation: Protecting Emergency Responders Volume 3: Safety Management in Disaster and Terrorism Response, Brian A. Jackson, John C. Baker, M. Susan Ridgely, James T. Bartis, Herbert I. Linn, RAND, 2004, MR-170-NIOSH, full report, research brief, press release.

  3. The societal promise of improving care for depression
    Modest, practical programs to improve care for depression can decrease the heavy personal and societal burdens of this disease.

    Citation: The societal promise of improving care for depression, RB-9055, full text.

    More on Partners in Care: Improving Care for Depression in Primary Care

  4. Reporting about health care quality: A guide to the galaxy
    Seven basic principles should be followed when reporting information about health care quality to consumers or other audiences.

    Citation: Reporting about Health Care Quality: A Guide to the Galaxy, Kanouse DE, Spranca M, Vaiana M, Health Promotion Practice, Vol. 4, No. 3, July 2004, pp. 222-231, abstract.

  5. Do sociodemographic differences matter for Hispanic patients who are HIV infected?
    Using data from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, this research showed that Hispanic men and Hispanic patients exposed to HIV by drug use and heterosexual sex need special attention when programs to improve access to care are designed.

    Citation: Sociodemographic Differences in Access to Care Among Hispanic Patients Who Are HIV Infected in the United States, Morales LS, Cunningham WE, Galvan FH, Andersen RM, Nakazono TT, Shapiro MF, American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 94, No. 7, July 2004, pp. 1119-1121, abstract.

  6. Continuity of care for children

    Nearly all young children aged 4 to 35 months in the United States have a regular setting in which they get well-child care, but less than half have a specific clinician.

    Citation: Continuity of Primary Care Clinician in Early Childhood, Inkelas M, Schuster MA, Olson LM, Park CH, Halfon, N, Pediatrics, Vol. 113 No. 6 June 2004, pp. 1917-1925, abstract.

    More on children's health

  7. News About RAND Health

    Our latest congressional newsletter covers quality of care and improving depression treatment, full text (PDF).

    The National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation is preparing for their 11th Annual Health Care Research Award and has asked us to provide you with the details.

    Housekeeping

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