July 2005 RAND Health Newsletter

Contents of July 2005 RAND Health newsletter:

  1. Maximizing HIV prevention in the U.S.
  2. New tool for public health agencies to evaluate their own effectiveness
  3. Conspiracy beliefs about birth control
  4. Many adults with HIV perceive discrimination by health care providers
  5. Evaluation of the London Patient Choice Project
  6. July RAND Health Congressional Newsletter



  1. Maximizing HIV prevention in the U.S.
    Focusing HIV-related interventions on the most cost-effective strategies may prevent substantially more HIV infections in the United States each year than current approaches.

    Citation: Cost-Effective Allocation Of Government Funds To Prevent HIV Infection. Cohen DA, Wu S-Y, Farley TA. Health Affairs, Vol. 24, No. 4, July/Aug 2005, pp. 915-926, news release, research brief, abstract

  2. New tool for public health agencies to evaluate their own effectiveness
    This operations manual provides a set of standardized proficiency tests to help public health agencies evaluate their own disease reporting systems and their responsiveness to case reports 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

    Citation: Tests to Evaluate Public Health Disease Reporting Systems in Local Public Health Agencies. Dausey DJ, Lurie N, Diamond A, Meade B, Molander RC, Ricci K, Stoto MA, Wasserman J., 2005, full document

  3. Conspiracy beliefs about birth control
    Many African American respondents to a recent survey endorsed conspiracy beliefs about birth control, including the belief that it is a form of Black genocide and that it is unsafe. Public health practitioners can play a major role in dispelling such beliefs.

    Citation: Conspiracy Beliefs about Birth Control: Barriers to Pregnancy Prevention among African Americans of Reproductive Age. Thorburn S, Bogart LM. Health Education & Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 4, Aug 1 2005, pp. 474-487, abstract

    More on public health research

  4. Many adults with HIV perceive discrimination by health care providers
    Twenty-six percent of HIV-infected adults in a national sample perceived some form of discrimination by a health care provider. Whites were more likely than Latinos or Blacks to report the problem.

    Citation: Perceptions of Discrimination in Clinical Care in a National Sample of HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Health Care, Schuster MA, Collins RL, Cunningham WE, Morton SC, Zierler S, Wong M, Tu W, Kanouse DE. Journal of General Internal Medicine [Epub ahead of print July 1 2005],

  5. Evaluation of the London Patient Choice Project
    The London Patient Choice Project (LPCP) was established to offer choices to patients who were clinically eligible for treatment and had been waiting for treatment at an NHS London hospital beyond a target waiting time. This report covers the choice process and the trade-offs patients are willing to make in order to obtain earlier treatment.

    Citation: London Patient Choice Project Evaluation: A Model of Patients' Choices of Hospital from Stated and Revealed Preference Choice Data. Burge P, Devlin N, Appleby J, Rohr C, Grant J., 2005, full document

  6. July RAND Health Congressional Newsletter
    This month's newsletter features research on cost effective ways to fight HIV, an online tool designed for HIV prevention community planning groups, and information about a policy impact award won by RAND's HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study. (PDF file)

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    Mary Vaiana, Communications Director, RAND Health, can be reached at mary_vaiana@rand.org.


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