July 2007 RAND Health Newsletter

The RAND Health Newsletter is a monthly update that features recent research from RAND Health.


Contents of July 2007 RAND Health newsletter:

  1. Health insurance subsidies won't significantly cut number of uninsured
  2. RAND’s Bing Center Announces Winners of Fuchs Research Award
  3. Interim between prior pregnancies has implications for fetal loss in current pregnancy
  4. Testing for HPV during triage may reduce costs and stress for women with BMD
  5. Prescription Drug Cost Sharing and Access
  6. Can Adolescents Predict Significant Life Events?
  7. Incentives appear to reduce smoking or even encourage abstinence
  8. New treatment for chronic hepatitis B resulted in higher expense, but improved health outcomes
  9. July RAND Health Congressional Newsletter
  10. Recent research highlights and fact sheets from RAND Health

  1. Health insurance subsidies won't significantly cut number of uninsured

    Government subsidies that cut health insurance premium prices in half for people without insurance would reduce the number of uninsured Americans by just 3 percent.

  2. Citation: Marquis M, Beeuwkes Buntin M, Escarce J, Kapur K. The Role of Product Design in Consumers' Choices in the Individual Insurance Market, Health Services Research, [Epub April 19 2007]
  3. RAND’s Bing Center announces winners of Fuchs Research Award

    The Victor S. Fuchs Research Award for Health Economics, which carries a $10,000 prize, has been granted to researchers Martin Gaynor, Jian Li, and William B. Vogt, all of Carnegie Mellon University, for a paper examining the effects of increased drug copayments on spending for drugs and other medical care.
  4. Interim between prior pregnancies has implications for fetal loss in current pregnancy

    Women whose pregnancies are between 15 and 75 months after a prior pregnancy have a lower likelihood of fetal loss than women with shorter or longer inter-pregnancy intervals.
  5. Citation: Davanzo J, Hale L, Razzaque A, Rahman M. Effects of Interpregnancy Interval and Outcome of the Preceding Pregnancy on Pregnancy Outcomes in Matlab, Bangladesh, BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,, [Epub July 6 2007]
  6. Testing for HPV during triage may reduce costs and stress for women with BMD

    Women with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic (BMD) smears in cervical cancer screenings could benefit if testing for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) were undertaken during initial triage.
  7. Citation: Rebolj M, Bais AG, van Ballegooijen M, Boer R, Meerding W-J, Helmerhorst TJM, Habbema JDF. Early Detection and Diagnosis: Human Papillomavirus Triage of Women with Persistent Borderline or Mildly Dyskaryotic Smears: Comparison of Costs and Side Effects of Three Alternative Strategies, International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 121, No. 7, Oct 2007, pp. 1529-1535 [Epub June 12 2007].
  8. Prescription Drug Cost Sharing and Access

    Increased cost sharing is highly correlated with reductions in pharmacy use, worse adherence among existing users, and more frequent discontinuation of therapy.
    Citation: Goldman DP, Joyce GF, Zheng Y. Prescription Drug Cost Sharing: Associations with Medication and Medical Utilization and Spending and Health, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 298, No. 1, July 4 2007, pp. 61-69.
  9. Can Adolescents Predict Significant Life Events?

    Adolescents accurately judged significant life outcomes - except for premature death rates, which they greatly overestimated.
  10. Citation: de Bruin WB, Parker AM, Fischhoff B. Can Adolescents Predict Significant Life Events?, Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 41, No. 2, Aug 2007, pp. 208-210.
  11. Incentives appear to reduce smoking or even encourage abstinence

    Complacent smokers who were given incentives to reduce their smoking levels over 3 months showed signs of smoking less or even quitting, whereas a control group or smokers with no contingent incentives did neither.
  12. Citation: Lamb RJ. Morral AR, Kirby KC, Javors MA, Galbicka G, Iguchi MY. Contingencies for Change in Complacent Smokers, Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Vol. 15, No. 3, June 2007, pp. 245-255.
  13. New treatment for chronic hepatitis B resulted in higher expense, but improved health outcomes

    A new treatment for chronic hepatitis B for 48 weeks resulted in an improvement in health outcomes, although it was more expensive than 4 years of treatments with a comparison drug (lamivudine).
  14. Citation: Veenstra DL, Sullivan SD, Dusheiko GM, Jacobs M, Aledort JE, Lewis G, Patel KK. Cost-Effectiveness of Peginterferon [Alpha]-2a Compared with Lamivudine Treatment in Patients with Hbe-Antigen-Positive Chronic Hepatitis B in The United Kingdom, European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Vol. 19, No. 8, Aug 2007, pp.631-638.
  15. July RAND Health Congressional Newsletter

    The July newsletter features two research items: 1) How benefit design affects consumer decisions in the individual insurance marketplace and 2) patients with multiple chronic conditions receive a higher quality of care.
  16. Recent research highlights and fact sheets from RAND Health


    Using Outcomes to Assess Teen Substance-Use Treatment Programs -- How Feasible? — RB9269
    Using the ''Getting to Outcomes'' Approach to Help Communities Prevent Underage Drinking — RB9262
    Health Coverage Options for Military Retirees — RB9236

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