Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Use by Adults in the U.S.

CONCLUDED STUDY - conducted 2009-2010

What was the Seasonal Influenza Survey?

In this image, a medical professional is preparing a vaccination shot

In March 2010, RAND surveyed a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults age 18 and over (n=4,040) to collect data on the receipt of seasonal influenza vaccine in the United States. The survey was designed to inform public health officials and other stakeholders about seasonal influenza vaccination of adults shortly following the end of the vaccination season. The information on flu vaccine uptake among population groups should be of interest to those working to increase uptake among different segments of the population.

In 2009, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) specifically recommended annual seasonal influenza vaccination for the following groups of adults living outside of nursing homes and other institutionalized settings: those age 50 or over; persons having certain high-risk medical conditions; health care workers; women who will be pregnant during flu season; and those having close contact with or caring for children under 5 years of age, persons age 50 or over, or other high-risk individuals.[1] Survey data described here suggest that together these groups comprise roughly three in four community-dwelling adults in the United States. The ACIP also recommended annual vaccination against seasonal influenza for any adult who wants to reduce the risk of becoming ill with seasonal influenza or transmitting it to others.

By the end of the 2009-2010 vaccination season:

  • 39 percent of U.S. adults had been vaccinated for seasonal influenza.
  • 45 percent of specifically recommended adults had been vaccinated for seasonal influenza.
  • 21 percent of adults not specifically recommended for vaccination were vaccinated.

This survey was conducted with the funding and support of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). The findings have been subject to RAND's rigorous quality assurance process and RAND alone is responsible for the content.

References

[1] A.E. Fiore et al., Prevention and control of influenza: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). 2009. MMWR. Recomm Rep, 2009. 58(RR08): pp. 1-52.