The RAND Military Caregivers Study

The RAND Military Caregivers Study focuses on the caregivers of wounded, ill, and injured military servicemembers and veterans. Funded by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation, the study aims to quantify military caregivers' needs and examine existing policies and programs for meeting them.

Who Are Military Caregivers?

A military caregiver is a family member, friend, or acquaintance who provides a broad range of care and assistance for, or manages the care of, a current or former military servicemember with a disabling physical or mental injury or illness.

Although significant attention has been paid to servicemembers and veterans with service-related injuries and associated conditions, little is known about the needs of their caregivers or the resources that exist to meet them.

What's New

  • Hidden Heroes: America's Military Caregivers

    Mar 31, 2014

    There are 5.5 million military caregivers across the United States, with nearly 20 percent caring for someone who served since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Military caregivers experience more health problems, face greater strains in family relationships, and have more workplace issues than noncaregivers. Changes are needed to both provide assistance to caregivers and to help them make plans for the future.

From the RAND Blog

  • Parallel Caregiver Crises, Military and Civilian

    Jul 9, 2014

    Among American caregivers, there are two expanding populations: those caring for military servicemembers struggling with physical or emotional wounds of war and those looking after people with dementia. Both face incalculable financial stresses and threats to their own health as a result of their caregiving roles.