News and Events in RAND Justice, Infrastructure, and Environment

  • Community Justice Center in San Francisco Is Associated with Lower Rearrest Rates

    Oct 8, 2014

    San Francisco opened the Community Justice Center in 2009 to serve its Tenderloin district and adjacent neighborhoods. Those arrested for an eligible offense in the Center catchment area after it opened were 8.9 to 10.3 percent less likely to be rearrested within one year.

  • In Ferguson's Wake, How a Data-Driven Approach Can Improve Police-Community Relations

    Sep 16, 2014

    Community leaders and police departments have a responsibility to their citizens to address questions about their policing practices, such as: What are the most significant areas of concern? How severe are the problems? What are the most effective solutions?

  • The State of Washington and Its Focus on Rehabilitation

    Sep 16, 2014

    California can learn a great deal from the state of Washington, which has implemented a series of reforms focused on rehabilitation—on diverting offenders to treatment and other options and making serving time in prison the last option.

  • The Effects of Tort Reform On Physician Labor Supply

    Sep 12, 2014

    Noneconomic damage caps increase the supply of physicians in high-risk specialties, but the effect of these caps varies across states. New approaches are needed to estimate state-specific effects of tort reform in order to have the most impact on local policy debates.

  • If You Want Ex-Cons to Be 'Productive Members of Society,' Ban the Box

    Sep 5, 2014

    When an inmate is released, you often hear Americans say that he's “paid his debt” and can now become “a productive member of society.” But the reality is ex-cons pay for their crimes long after sentences end. On the outside, the stigma of incarceration makes it extremely difficult to land a job.

  • The Silicon Valley Tech Industry Can Help Crime Victims

    Aug 11, 2014

    A broader approach is needed to better address the needs of millions of American victims of crimes like sexual assault, family violence, financial exploitation, gun violence, identity theft, burglary and stalking. And that's where Silicon Valley's tech community can step up.

  • Exploring the Future of Driving in Developing Countries

    Jul 15, 2014

    The level of automobility, or travel in personal vehicles, varies among countries. By determining the factors besides economic development that have affected automobility in developed countries, researchers can predict how automobility might evolve in developing countries.

  • Driving in the Future in Developing Countries

    Jul 15, 2014

    Income is not necessarily destiny when it comes to how many people drive their own cars. Nine additional factors affect the likelihood that people will drive.

  • What if Distracted Driving Was Safe?

    Jul 1, 2014

    According to consumer research, the ability to consume media, write an email, or even sleep during transport is a key selling point for self-driving cars, which could be available in the near future. Autonomous vehicle technology could also produce a wide range of public benefits.

  • New Coal Plant Rules Need Sustained Support to Succeed

    Jun 30, 2014

    Stopping climate change will require the U.S. and the rest of the world to virtually eliminate emissions over the course of the 21st century. Getting anywhere close to zero emissions demands sustained political and public support, driven by an energy production sector given enough incentives.

  • An Enduring Need for Better Measures of Emergency Preparedness

    Jun 25, 2014

    In an era of fiscal austerity, the need for measurement and assessment becomes manifold. Tied to good government goals and responsible stewardship of public funds, measurements are also necessary to educate the public about what it should—and should not—reasonably expect when disaster strikes.

  • Water Management and Climate Resilience in Pittsburgh: Building a Research Agenda

    Jun 24, 2014

    At this June 2014 event, part of our Conversations at RAND series, a panel of experts discusses ways to strengthen Pittsburgh's water management system, create sustainable solutions to environmental challenges, and better manage long-term uncertainty.

  • RAND Research Influences Debate on Terrorism Insurance

    Jun 19, 2014

    To inform the debate on whether the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA) should be continued or allowed to expire, RAND prepared policy briefs on three topics of central concern to policymakers: national security perspectives, the impact on federal spending, and the impact on workers' compensation markets.

  • Securing America's Ports by Better Measuring Capabilities

    Jun 13, 2014

    Funding for improving U.S. port security has declined from $389 million in 2008 to $100 million in 2014. This makes it more important than ever to ensure the highest possible return on investment from grant funding.

  • 3 Terrorism Risk Insurance Act Facts for Congress to Consider

    Jun 12, 2014

    With the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act set to expire this year, Congress is currently revisiting a crucial question: What is the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets? As the debate unfolds on Capitol Hill, policymakers should consider three key research findings.

  • The Future of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act: Expiration, Reauthorization, Modification

    Jun 11, 2014

    In this June 2014 Congressional Briefing, RAND experts presented findings from their recent work on the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act (TRIA) and discuss the different outcomes if TRIA were to be reauthorized, modified, or allowed to expire.

  • Conference on the Future of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act

    Jun 10, 2014

    To inform the debate on whether TRIA should be continued or allowed to expire, RAND is convening a conference that will bring together stakeholders to not only discuss the varying implications of TRIA’s expiration, modification, and extension, but also to frame how it is debated in the halls of Congress and across the country.

  • Securing America's Ports

    Jun 4, 2014

    America's ports could be made more secure by improving the evaluation of port security programs; increasing the reliance on local risk assessments when awarding port security grants; and reconsidering the 100 percent container inspection mandate.

  • Allowing Terrorism Risk Insurance Act to Expire Would Negatively Impact Workers' Compensation Insurance Markets

    May 7, 2014

    Without TRIA in place, employers perceived to be at high risk for terrorism might have to obtain workers' compensation coverage in markets of last resort, known as residual markets, which could charge higher premiums.

  • Legalising Cannabis Is More Than Just a Yes or No Decision

    May 2, 2014

    Any truly honest discussion about how to regulate cannabis markets must start with clear objectives and goals. How these markets are opened can be as important as the decision to legalize cannabis.

  • State Court Systems’ Stability Depends on Understanding Diverse Funding and Governance Approaches

    Apr 30, 2014

    In the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, state judicial systems experienced budget cuts that resulted in new and different approaches to funding and governance. Comprehending the dimension of these differences is key to future stability of these court systems.

  • Make HOT Lanes Permanent

    Apr 23, 2014

    The first HOT lanes in L.A. have improved traffic flow and travel time reliability, are fair to users of the facilities, have improved transit service and have generated revenue needed to fund those improvements from voluntary toll payments.

  • Developing Public Health Regulations for Marijuana: Lessons from Alcohol and Tobacco

    Apr 17, 2014

    Policymakers can better understand decisions surrounding legal marijuana by drawing on lessons learned from research on public health approaches to regulating alcohol and tobacco.

  • Sending Prisoners to College Will Save You Money

    Apr 11, 2014

    Correctional education works for states because it saves money and shrinks prison populations. It works for prisoners, the public, law enforcement, and the judicial system because educated prisoners are less likely to return to their criminal ways once released.

  • Extending Terrorism Insurance Program Could Save Federal Government Money After Future Attacks

    Apr 10, 2014

    The Terrorism Risk Insurance Act will expire at the end of this year and Congress is considering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. In a terrorist attack with losses up to $50 billion, the federal government would spend more helping to cover losses than if it had continued to support a national terrorism risk insurance program.