RAND Institute for Civil Justice

ICJ in the News

A selection of news reporting and commentary on RAND's Civil Justice research.

  • Extending Terrorism Insurance Program Could Save Federal Government Money After Future Attacks

    Apr 10, 2014

    The Terrorism Risk Insurance Act will expire at the end of this year and Congress is considering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. In a terrorist attack with losses up to $50 billion, the federal government would spend more helping to cover losses than if it had continued to support a national terrorism risk insurance program.

  • ACA Could Change Costs of Auto, Malpractice, and Other Liability Insurance

    Apr 9, 2014

    As more Americans become newly covered under the Affordable Care Act, the cost of providing automobile insurance, workers compensation, and homeowners insurance may decline. Meanwhile, an increase in the number of people using the health care system may trigger a corresponding increase in the number of medical malpractice claims.

  • Expiration of Terrorism Risk Insurance Act Could Hurt National Security

    Mar 6, 2014

    The current terrorism risk insurance act will expire in 2014 and Congress again is considering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. If the act expires and the take-up rate for terrorism insurance falls, then the U.S. would be less resilient to future terrorist attacks.

  • Self-Driving Vehicles Offer Potential Benefits, Policy Challenges for Lawmakers

    Jan 6, 2014

    Self-driving vehicles offer the promise of significant benefits to society, but raise several policy challenges, including the need to update insurance liability regulations and privacy concerns such as who will control the data generated by this technology.

  • Rising Cost of Flood Insurance Will Create Serious Challenges for New York City

    Oct 25, 2013

    Some New York City residents may soon face sharp increases in their flood insurance premiums as a result of major changes occurring in the National Flood Insurance Program and the redrawing of flood maps that expand the areas at risk. Property owners in areas now deemed at highest risk may face increases of $5,000 to $10,000 annually.