About the Safety and Justice Program

The RAND Safety and Justice Program conducts research on topics related to public safety and the performance of the U.S. criminal justice system for federal law enforcement and other agencies, urban police departments, and other clients. Policy and research areas include policing, law enforcement, and corrections; crime, gangs, and violence prevention; drug abuse and drug policy; administration of justice, law, courts, and governance; and occupational and transportation safety.

Selected News and Publications

  • Data Key to Tackling Racial Profiling in Ferguson

    Aug 21, 2014

    Authorities in Ferguson would be wise to consider following Cincinnati's example in dealing with mistrust between police and citizens after the police shooting of a young black man. The city embarked on a thorough examination of racial profiling by its police force and took steps to deal with the perception that bias was influencing the way police officers performed their duties.

  • An Enduring Need for Better Measures of Emergency Preparedness

    Jun 25, 2014

    In an era of fiscal austerity, the need for measurement and assessment becomes manifold. Tied to good government goals and responsible stewardship of public funds, measurements are also necessary to educate the public about what it should—and should not—reasonably expect when disaster strikes.

  • Legalising Cannabis Is More Than Just a Yes or No Decision

    May 2, 2014

    Any truly honest discussion about how to regulate cannabis markets must start with clear objectives and goals. How these markets are opened can be as important as the decision to legalise cannabis.

  • Developing Public Health Regulations for Marijuana: Lessons from Alcohol and Tobacco

    Apr 17, 2014

    Policymakers can better understand decisions surrounding legal marijuana by drawing on lessons learned from research on public health approaches to regulating alcohol and tobacco.

  • Sending Prisoners to College Will Save You Money

    Apr 11, 2014

    Correctional education works for states because it saves money and shrinks prison populations. It works for prisoners, the public, law enforcement, and the judicial system because educated prisoners are less likely to return to their criminal ways once released.

  • How Big Is the U.S. Market for Illegal Drugs?

    Mar 10, 2014

    In order to think sensibly about illicit drug markets, policymakers need to have some idea of how big those markets are. This helps estimate revenues going to criminal organizations, improve treatment and prevention decisions, and evaluate drug policies.