About the Safety and Justice Program

The RAND Safety and Justice Program conducts research on topics related to public safety and the performance of the U.S. criminal justice system for federal law enforcement and other agencies, urban police departments, and other clients. Policy and research areas include policing, law enforcement, and corrections; crime, gangs, and violence prevention; drug abuse and drug policy; administration of justice, law, courts, and governance; and occupational and transportation safety.

Selected News and Publications

  • Criminal Justice Technology Taxonomy Web Tool

    Feb 2, 2015

    For law enforcement personnel, the starting point for considering future technological and other innovations is the baseline that exists today. A taxonomy of current technologies in community and institutional corrections can provide direction when budgets are limited.

  • High-Priority Information Technology Needs for Law Enforcement

    Jan 19, 2015

    Law enforcement’s knowledge of IT, its use, and dissemination of information can and need to be improved. A RAND study reporting on strategic planning activities supporting the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) provides potential solutions.

  • Interactive Tool for Ranking Corrections Innovation Needs

    Jan 6, 2015

    Institutional and community corrections agencies are facing increasingly complex tasks and challenges that call for innovative tools, technology, practices, and approaches. Given resource constraints, a tool to establish priorities among a multitude of possible innovations can help agencies improve their ability to protect and serve.

  • Innovation in the U.S. Corrections Sector: What Are the Opportunities?

    Jan 6, 2015

    The public has high expectations for corrections agencies to protect society. To meet this goal, agencies are recognizing that innovation in technology and practices is crucial. A method of ranking to assess what is in use today and to predict high priority future needs is a way to map the opportunities.

  • Data Key to Tackling Racial Profiling in Ferguson

    Aug 21, 2014

    Authorities in Ferguson would be wise to consider following Cincinnati's example in dealing with mistrust between police and citizens after the police shooting of a young black man. The city embarked on a thorough examination of racial profiling by its police force and took steps to deal with the perception that bias was influencing the way police officers performed their duties.

  • An Enduring Need for Better Measures of Emergency Preparedness

    Jun 25, 2014

    In an era of fiscal austerity, the need for measurement and assessment becomes manifold. Tied to good government goals and responsible stewardship of public funds, measurements are also necessary to educate the public about what it should—and should not—reasonably expect when disaster strikes.