National Security

RAND conducts a broad array of national security research for the U.S. Department of Defense. RAND also carries out an extensive research program in homeland security, homeland defense, and terrorism-related research for the U.S. Government, as well as selected research for key allied governments and ministries of defense. Through its long-term investment in federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCs), the U.S. government has built a network of institutions with unique analytical and technical capabilities.

National security research is conducted by the following RAND FFRDCs: RAND Project AIR FORCE, sponsored by the U.S. Air Force; RAND Arroyo Center, sponsored by the U.S. Army; RAND National Defense Research Institute, sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

  • Exploring America's Role in a Turbulent World

    Jan 18, 2017

    The post–Cold War era is over. The United States faces new challenges abroad and rising political polarization at home. How should America advance its interests and pursue new opportunities around the world?

  • Domestic Political Discord Is Now the Greatest Threat to U.S. Global Leadership

    Jan 18, 2017

    The United States needs a coherent international strategy for today's turbulent world. But this will be hard to pursue without more domestic political consensus on America's global role.

  • Trump and Russia: Challenges and Opportunities

    Jan 13, 2017

    In this Call with the Experts, our panel discusses the risks and opportunities that lie ahead with respect to U.S.-Russian relations.

  • How to Prevent State Collapse in Syria

    Jan 9, 2017

    Syria will likely be a weak state in a volatile region when its civil war ends. How can U.S. policy create conditions for a transition that helps fight terrorism and preserve state institutions?

  • Supporting the U.S. Air Force's Wounded Warriors

    Jan 6, 2017

    A high proportion of airmen injured in combat experience mental health issues. And 15 percent of those surveyed were unemployed. Recovery and reintegration are likely to take a long time. This will require ongoing program evaluation and continuous efforts to improve program offerings.

National Security News