National Security

RAND conducts a broad array of national security research for the U.S. Department of Defense. RAND also carries out an extensive research program in homeland security, homeland defense, and terrorism-related research for the U.S. Government, as well as selected research for key allied governments and ministries of defense. Through its long-term investment in federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCs), the U.S. government has built a network of institutions with unique analytical and technical capabilities.

National security research is conducted by the following RAND FFRDCs: RAND Project AIR FORCE, sponsored by the U.S. Air Force; RAND Arroyo Center, sponsored by the U.S. Army; RAND National Defense Research Institute, sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

  • Key Skills and Competences for Defence

    Jul 30, 2015

    RAND Europe identified key skills and competences for the European Defence Technological and Industrial Base and developed a range of potential measures that could help to address some of the problems identified in the labour market for defence key skills.

  • Choices for America in a Turbulent World

    Jul 23, 2015

    Today, the United States faces no existential threat. Rather, it confronts an unusually wide and diverse array of challenges. What strategic choices does it have in dealing with these challenges—and tomorrow's?

  • Family Resilience in the Military

    Jul 10, 2015

    The U.S. Department of Defense has 26 policies related to family resilience, but definitions of it vary across the services. To facilitate a comprehensive view of family resilience programming, a well-articulated, standard definition of family resilience is needed.

  • Airpower in the Libyan Civil War

    Jul 8, 2015

    In 2011, a coalition of nations waged a war against Muammar Qaddafi's regime that reversed the tide of Libya's civil war. The intervention's central element was a relatively small air campaign. What lessons did each nation glean from the experience?

  • An Assessment of the Counter-ISIL Campaign: One Year After Mosul

    Jun 24, 2015

    ISIL's continuing strength demonstrates that adjustments to the current U.S. approach to counter it are necessary. The best strategy is to defeat and destroy ISIL through a partnered approach. But partnering with the Iraqi government presents a difficult challenge.

National Security News

  • Former Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel Elected to RAND Board of Trustees

    May 27, 2015

    Chuck Hagel, the only enlisted soldier and Vietnam War veteran to serve as secretary of defense, has been elected to the RAND Board of Trustees. He served as the 24th U.S. Secretary of Defense from February 2013 to February 2015 and as a U.S. senator, representing his home state of Nebraska, from 1997 to 2009.

  • Cornish Joins RAND Europe to Lead Defence, Security and Infrastructure Group

    Jan 20, 2015

    Professor Paul Cornish has joined RAND Europe to lead its research in the areas of defence, security and infrastructure. Specifically, the research aims to provide analytical and decision-support work in defence, security and cyber policy, together with analysis of market demand and decision-making in a wide range of complex public policy areas.

  • Brian Michael Jenkins Joins Elite Panel on Domestic Intelligence Gathering

    Aug 26, 2014

    Brian Michael Jenkins, senior adviser to the RAND president and an expert on transportation security and terrorism, has joined the “Blue Ribbon Panel,” which will preside over work by a Business Executives for National Security task force to determine whether post-9/11 reforms have kept pace with evolving threats to homeland security.

  • Gen. Amos Discusses the Future of the USMC at RAND

    Jan 29, 2014

    The hard-won lessons of Afghanistan and Iraq over the last decade will serve the U.S. Marine Corps well as it faces new challenges around the world, Marine Corps Commandant James F. Amos told a gathering at RAND's Washington headquarters.

  • Lasting Consequences of World War II Means More Illness, Lower Education, and Fewer Chances to Marry for Survivors

    Jan 21, 2014

    Experiencing World War II is associated with a greater chance of suffering from diabetes, depression, and heart disease as adults. And because so many men died during the war, fewer women married and many children were left to grow up without fathers.