National Security

RAND conducts a broad array of national security research for the U.S. Department of Defense. RAND also carries out an extensive research program in homeland security, homeland defense, and terrorism-related research for the U.S. Government, as well as selected research for key allied governments and ministries of defense. Through its long-term investment in federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCs), the U.S. government has built a network of institutions with unique analytical and technical capabilities.

National security research is conducted by the following RAND FFRDCs: RAND Project AIR FORCE, sponsored by the U.S. Air Force; RAND Arroyo Center, sponsored by the U.S. Army; RAND National Defense Research Institute, sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

  • Exploring the Course and Consequences of a Sino-U.S. War

    Jul 28, 2016

    Premeditated war between the United States and China is very unlikely, but the danger that a mishandled crisis could trigger hostilities cannot be ignored. A new analysis illuminates various paths a war could take and their possible effects.

  • How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards?

    Jul 22, 2016

    Rigorous analyses by Susan Burkhauser and Mustafa Oguz (both cohort '09) of the selection processes for the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point show that the academies' processes predict students' future success as officers.

  • Afghan Government Support for Local Police Program Is Shaky

    Jul 21, 2016

    Established by U.S. and NATO special operations forces, the Afghan Local Police program was designed to become part of the Afghan Ministry of Interior Affairs (MOI). The MOI has made progress in logistics, personnel management, and training activities, but faces serious gaps in its ability to sustain the program.

  • Millennials: Implications for the Intelligence Community

    Jul 18, 2016

    Millennials are now the largest generational segment of the U.S. population. How should the intelligence community adapt to interact with them as clients, employees, partners, and citizens?

  • U.S. Department of Defense Experiences with Substituting Government Employees for Military Personnel

    Jul 14, 2016

    There is considerable opportunity to identify positions suitable for military-to-civilian conversion, but there are numerous impediments to authorizing and executing military-to-civilian conversions, according to research by (then-students) Julia Pollak and Brian Gordon (both cohort '12), and professors Jennifer Lewis and Ed Keating.

National Security News

  • Sladden Presents Research at RUSI Land Warfare Conference in London

    Jul 1, 2016

    RAND Europe analyst James Sladden and RAND senior international policy analyst Linda Robinson addressed the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) Land Warfare Conference in London on 28 June 2016.

  • Persi Paoli Speaks at Arms Trade Treaty Workshop

    Apr 11, 2016

    RAND Europe expert Giacomo Persi Paoli participated in a workshop on building capacity for the implementation of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), hosted by the UN Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific in cooperation with the Government of Thailand, on 4-5 April 2016 in Bangkok.

  • RAND Studies Help Inform Pentagon Decision to Open Combat Roles to Women

    Feb 5, 2016

    RAND researchers addressed topics such as whether members of U.S. special forces are ready to integrate women into their ranks and what lessons may be learned from other militaries that already have integrated women into combat positions.

  • Henry S. Rowen, Second President of RAND, Dies at 90

    Nov 16, 2015

    Henry “Harry” S. Rowen, who as the second president of the RAND Corporation oversaw the creation of its graduate school and extended RAND's reach into domestic policy in the 1970s, has died.

  • RAND Hosts Cybersecurity Exercise

    Sep 3, 2015

    The discussion of cybersecurity should not be trapped within narrow technical, national security, or legal stovepipes and should include an examination of economic, civil, and societal factors. With that goal in mind, RAND hosted an analytic exercise on cybersecurity.