Logistics and Infrastructure

Cargo Plane

Overview

RAND analyses help policymakers understand how to structure responsive logistics systems and develop policies and strategies to create an effective and efficient defense infrastructure.

Organization

Research on logistics and defense infrastructure issues is conducted within each of RAND's national security research divisions and collaboratively across the RAND research community.

Key Research Centers:

  • What Can the U.S. Army Learn from France's War in Mali?

    Oct 17, 2014

    French Army operations in Mali, also known as Operation Serval, provide an example of how a technologically sophisticated army organizes and fields an expeditionary force. While the French way of war may not be optimal for U.S. commanders, who have greater resources at their disposal, the Army should still examine Serval for useful insights.

  • Improving DHS Accountability for Acquisitions

    Apr 22, 2014

    As the House of Representatives considers legislation that would reform the Department of Homeland Security's acquisitions process, an important issues come to the forefront—the need for accountability in the acquisitions process.

  • The U.S. Army Must Remain Prepared for Battle

    Apr 18, 2014

    Converting the Army into a force suited only for homeland defense or humanitarian missions abroad, without the ability to fight sophisticated foes as part of a joint force, would result in an unprepared Army.

Thumb: Corporate Publication

Moving Toward a Sustainable U.S. Defense Budget - Speech Given June 15, 2010, at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore — 2010

K. Jack Riley

Spending on national security accounts for over 60 percent of the discretionary budget, and pressure to reduce U.S. defense spending is mounting. This paper, based on a speech given in June 2010 at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, briefly outlines the budgetary pressures for limiting U.S. defense spending, the lack of obvious targets for spending reductions within the defense budget, and the factors militating against a reduction in U.S. security commitments abroad. The author finds some potential for reduced defense spending if intelligence and law enforcement agencies and aid institutions can assume more of the counterterrorism mission or if the ability of partner nations to ensure their own security can be increased.

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Catastrophe Risk Management in the Public Sector — 2010

In January 2010, RAND executive vice president Michael Rich spoke at the first International Symposium on Catastrophe Risk Management, commemorating the establishment of the Institute of Catastrophe Risk Management (ICRM) at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. In this transcript of the speech, he explains the importance of catastrophe risk management for policymaking in the face of deep uncertainty and discusses challenges for ICRM, RAND, and the rest of the analytic community.

Cover: Feasibility and Design Options for a Potential Entity to Research the Comparative Effectiveness of Medical Treatments

Global Combat Support Basing: Robust Prepositioning Strategies for Air Force War Reserve Materiel — 2010

The ability to rapidly deploy forces into austere locations is essential to the global power projection concept of operation. Much of the materiel used by such expeditionary forces does not deploy with the unit but is instead sourced from a global network of prepositioning storage locations, to reduce the transportation requirements associated with the movement of such materiel. Current storage concepts for prepositioned materiel are based on planning assumptions from the Cold War era: that deployment scenarios and their associated support requirements could be fairly well identified in advance and the necessary materiel prepositioned at anticipated deployment sites. This monograph identifies alternative approaches to storing combat support materiel that satisfy the requirements of deploying forces in an expeditionary environment that more closely resembles the current Department of Defense planning guidance, while simultaneously reducing total system costs and increasing robustness in the event of disruptions such as loss of access to a storage site.