Logistics and Infrastructure

Cargo Plane


RAND analyses help policymakers understand how to structure responsive logistics systems and develop policies and strategies to create an effective and efficient defense infrastructure.


Research on logistics and defense infrastructure issues is conducted within each of RAND's national security research divisions and collaboratively across the RAND research community.

Key Research Centers:

  • Improving the Cybersecurity of U.S. Air Force Weapon Systems

    Oct 27, 2015

    U.S. Air Force weapon systems containing information technology may be vulnerable to intelligence exploitation and cyberattacks. But there are steps that the Air Force can take to improve the security of these systems throughout their life cycles.

  • Additive Manufacturing and Obsolescence Management for Defence

    Oct 12, 2015

    To help defence policymakers understand the background and context regarding industrial 3-D printing and whether it could be useful for managing obsolescence in defence systems, RAND Europe collected and synthesised opinions of researchers in manufacturing and defence.

  • Multiple Factors Drive Program Success

    Sep 30, 2015

    Congress continues to express concerns about weapon system cost growth and is considering multiple acquisition reform proposals for the National Defense Authorization Act. One proposal would hold program managers accountable via a “performance agreement” for key parameters that must be met.

Thumb: Corporate Publication

Moving Toward a Sustainable U.S. Defense Budget - Speech Given June 15, 2010, at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore — 2010

K. Jack Riley

Spending on national security accounts for over 60 percent of the discretionary budget, and pressure to reduce U.S. defense spending is mounting. This paper, based on a speech given in June 2010 at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, briefly outlines the budgetary pressures for limiting U.S. defense spending, the lack of obvious targets for spending reductions within the defense budget, and the factors militating against a reduction in U.S. security commitments abroad. The author finds some potential for reduced defense spending if intelligence and law enforcement agencies and aid institutions can assume more of the counterterrorism mission or if the ability of partner nations to ensure their own security can be increased.

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Catastrophe Risk Management in the Public Sector — 2010

In January 2010, RAND executive vice president Michael Rich spoke at the first International Symposium on Catastrophe Risk Management, commemorating the establishment of the Institute of Catastrophe Risk Management (ICRM) at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. In this transcript of the speech, he explains the importance of catastrophe risk management for policymaking in the face of deep uncertainty and discusses challenges for ICRM, RAND, and the rest of the analytic community.

Cover: Feasibility and Design Options for a Potential Entity to Research the Comparative Effectiveness of Medical Treatments

Global Combat Support Basing: Robust Prepositioning Strategies for Air Force War Reserve Materiel — 2010

The ability to rapidly deploy forces into austere locations is essential to the global power projection concept of operation. Much of the materiel used by such expeditionary forces does not deploy with the unit but is instead sourced from a global network of prepositioning storage locations, to reduce the transportation requirements associated with the movement of such materiel. Current storage concepts for prepositioned materiel are based on planning assumptions from the Cold War era: that deployment scenarios and their associated support requirements could be fairly well identified in advance and the necessary materiel prepositioned at anticipated deployment sites. This monograph identifies alternative approaches to storing combat support materiel that satisfy the requirements of deploying forces in an expeditionary environment that more closely resembles the current Department of Defense planning guidance, while simultaneously reducing total system costs and increasing robustness in the event of disruptions such as loss of access to a storage site.