Pardee Center

The RAND Frederick S. Pardee Center for Longer Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condition was established in 2001 through a generous $5 million pledge from RAND alumnus Frederick S. Pardee. The RAND Pardee Center aims to enhance the overall future quality and condition of human life by aggressively disseminating and applying new methods for long-term policy analysis in a wide variety of policy areas where they are needed most.

The Pardee Center organizes its activities around two main themes: (1) advancing the state-of the-art in conducting long-term policy analysis so organizations can implement better long-range policy; and (2) developing and disseminating approaches that will help make proper stewardship for the future be more commonly practiced.

  • Enhancing the Climate Resilience of Africa's Infrastructure

    The World Bank is supporting research to examine the impact of climate change on water and energy infrastructure in Africa and suggest robust responses. The study focuses on seven of the most important river basins in Africa, as well as considering project-level case studies of five specific hydropower facilities.

  • RDMlab Innovates in Development of Robust Decision Sciences

    A collaboration among RAND, the Pardee RAND Graduate School, Evolving Logic, and network partners, RDMlab promotes the development and use of Robust Decision Making (RDM) methods for policy and decisionmaking.

  • Decisions for the Decade Game: Planning Under Deep Uncertainty

    Mar 25, 2015

    How do you engage decisionmakers in thinking about long-term, hard-to predict risks? RANDNext members will play an interactive game intended to promote discussion about the integration of global policy and real world decisionmaking.

  • Future of Coastal Flooding

    Feb 25, 2015

    President Obama's executive order that directs federal agencies to plan and build for higher flood levels as they construct new projects in flood-prone regions will affect hundreds of billions of dollars of future public works projects. In an ideal world, planners would estimate the benefits and costs for each project, taking into account everything from the details of the local landscape to the potential for adaptive responses over time.

  • Developing Robust Strategies for Climate Change and Other Risks: A Water Utility Framework

    Jan 26, 2015

    RAND researchers and collaborators present a comprehensive approach for water utilities to assess climate risks to their systems and evaluate adaptation strategies. The approach, based on Robust Decision Making (RDM) is demonstrated through pilot studies with two water utilities: Colorado Springs Utilities and New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

  • U.S.-China Global Warming Deal Could Signal Shift on Climate Change

    Dec 9, 2014

    The U.S.-China agreement on limiting greenhouse gas emissions represents a significant and welcome shift in the international approach to addressing climate change. For the first time, a large developing country has agreed to limit its greenhouse gas emissions—a crucial step since these countries have become the world’s largest sources.

  • RAND's Collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Lab Shows How High-Performance Computing Could Revolutionize Decisionmaking

    Nov 25, 2014

    RAND's Emerging Policy Research and Methods Program has signed a memorandum of understanding with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's High Performance Computing Innovation Center to explore how high-performance computing could enable near-real-time policy and decision analysis through the use of complex, at-scale models.

  • Second Annual Workshop on Decision Making Under Deep Uncertainty

    Nov 18, 2014

    This workshop aimed to foster a community of practice around decision making under deep uncertainty, in order to improve methods and tools, facilitate their use in practice, and ultimately encourage sound decision making in our rapidly changing world.

  • New Coal Plant Rules Need Sustained Support to Succeed

    Jun 30, 2014

    Stopping climate change will require the U.S. and the rest of the world to virtually eliminate emissions over the course of the 21st century. Getting anywhere close to zero emissions demands sustained political and public support, driven by an energy production sector given enough incentives.