Cover: Breaking the Social Contract

Breaking the Social Contract

The Fiscal Crisis in U.S. Higher Education

by Roger W. Benjamin, Stephen J. Carroll

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Abstract

This report offers the results of a two-year study by the Commission on National Investment in Higher Education. Established by the Council for Aid to Education in 1994, the Commission was asked to examine the financial health of America's higher education sector. Our central finding is that the present course of higher education — in which costs and demand are rising much faster than funding — is unsustainable. Therefore, we call upon the nation to address the fiscal crisis now, before millions of Americans are denied access to a college education.

Table of Contents

  • To Our Readers HTML

  • Overview HTML

  • The Threat from Within HTML

  • Dimensions of the Fiscal Crisis HTML

  • Institutional Roadblocks HTML

  • Recommendations HTML

  • Supporting Documents HTML

  • Members of the Commission on National Investment in Higher Education HTML

  • About the Council for Aid to Education HTML

  • Reviewers' comments about this report HTML

This report is part of the RAND Corporation CAE document series. Council for Aid to Education reports (CAE) were monograph/reports (MR) produced by the Council for Aid to Education. CAEs were published at RAND from 1997 to 2000. RAND monograph/reports presented major research findings that addressed the challenges facing the public and private sectors. They included executive summaries, technical documentation, and synthesis pieces.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.