Cover: Scope of Rapid HIV Testing in Private Nonprofit Urban Community Health Settings in the United States

Scope of Rapid HIV Testing in Private Nonprofit Urban Community Health Settings in the United States

Published In: American Journal of Public Health, v. 98, no. 4, Apr. 1, 2008, p. 736-742

by Laura M. Bogart, Devery Howerton, James Lange, Kirsten Becker, Claude Messan Setodji, Steven M. Asch

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The authors examined patterns of rapid HIV testing in a multistage national random sample of private, nonprofit, urban community clinics and community-based organizations to determine the extent of rapid HIV test availability outside the public health system. METHODS: The authors randomly sampled 12 primary metropolitan statistical areas in 4 regions; 746 sites were randomly sampled across areas and telephoned. Staff at 575 of the sites (78%) were reached, of which 375 were eligible and subsequently interviewed from 2005 to 2006. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of the sites offered rapid HIV tests (22% of clinics, 10% of community-based organizations). In multivariate models, rapid test availability was more likely among community clinics in the South (vs West), clinics in high HIV/AIDS prevalence areas, clinics with on-site laboratories and multiple locations, and clinics that performed other diagnostic tests. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid HIV tests were provided infrequently in private, nonprofit, urban community settings. Policies that encourage greater diffusion of rapid testing are needed, especially in community-based organizations and venues with fewer resources and less access to laboratories.

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