Cover: Small Area Variations in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Does the Neighborhood Matter?

Small Area Variations in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Does the Neighborhood Matter?

Published in: Annals of Internal Medicine, v. 153, no. 1, July 2010, p. 19-22, w-9-w12

by Comilla Sasson, Carla C Keirns, Dylan Smith, Michael Sayre, William Macy, William Meurer, Bryan F McNally, Arthur L. Kellermann, Theodore J Iwashyna

Read More

Access further information on this document at www.annals.org

This study was published in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal. The full text of the study can be found at the link above.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The incidence and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest vary widely across cities. It is unknown whether similar differences exist at the neighborhood level. Objective: To determine the extent to which neighborhoods have persistently high rates of cardiac arrest but low rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). DESIGN: Multilevel Poisson regression of 1108 cardiac arrests from 161 census tracts as captured by the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES). Setting: Fulton County, Georgia, between 1 October 2005 to 30 November 2008. MEASUREMENTS: Incidence of cardiac arrest, by census tract and year and by rates of bystander CPR. RESULTS: Adjusted rates of cardiac arrest varied across neighborhoods (interquartile range [IQR], 0.57 to 0.73 per 1000 persons; mean, 0.64 per 1000 persons [SD, 0.11]) but were stable from year to year (intraclass correlation, 0.36 [95% CI, 0.26 to 0.50]; P < 0.001). Adjusted bystander CPR rates also varied by census tract (IQR, 19% to 29%; mean, 25% [SD, 10%]). LIMITATION: Analysis was based on data from a single county. CONCLUSION: Surveillance data can identify neighborhoods with a persistently high incidence of cardiac arrest and low rates of bystander CPR. These neighborhoods are promising targets for community-based interventions.

Research conducted by

This report is part of the RAND Corporation external publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.