Effects of Efforts to Regionalize Emergency Medical Services

by Rae W. Archibald, Jan M. Chaiken, Patricia D. Fleischauer, D. Liebenson, Roger L. Rasmussen, Warren Walker

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Abstract

In 1973, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation awarded grants of up to $400,000 to 44 regions to promote the development of well-organized regional emergency medical systems (EMS). The present study investigates the principal effects associated with changes in the EMS systems of seven of the 44 regions funded by the Foundation. Chapter 2 details the research design. Chapter 3 discusses organizational regionalization of emergency medical services. Chapter 4 discusses the issue of simplified public access. Chapter 5 looks at central coordination of dispatching and communications, which is an adjunct to simplified public access. Chapter 6 explores ambulance-to-hospital radio communication, which can notify the emergency department of a patient's impending arrival. Chapter 7 discusses training of ambulance attendants.

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