Confronting the “Enemy Within”

What Can the United States Learn About Counterterrorism and Intelligence from Other Democracies?

by Peter Chalk, William Rosenau

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Abstract

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation was widely criticized for failing to prevent the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and some U.S. policymakers reacted by proposing a new domestic intelligence service devoted solely to counterterrorism. To inform the debate, the RAND Corporation analyzed domestic intelligence agencies in four other democracies. While differences exist between the United States and the countries studied, the cases provide insights that could guide policymakers if they decide to establish such an agency in the United States.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation research brief series. RAND research briefs present policy-oriented summaries of individual published, peer-reviewed documents or of a body of published work.

This research in the public interest was supported by RAND, using discretionary funds made possible by the generosity of RAND's donors, the fees earned on client-funded research, and independent research and development (IR&D) funds provided by the Department of Defense.

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