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Digital repositories can help Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to develop coherent and coordinated approaches to capture, identify, store and retrieve intellectual assets such as datasets, course material and research papers. With the advances of technology, an increasing number of Higher Education Institutions are implementing digital repositories. The leadership of these institutions, however, has been concerned about the awareness of and commitment to repositories, and their sustainability in the future.

This study informs a consortium of thirteen London institutions with an assessment of current awareness and attitudes of stakeholders regarding digital repositories in three case study institutions. The report identifies drivers for, and barriers to, the embedding of digital repositories in institutional strategy. The findings therefore should be of use to decision-makers involved in the development of digital repositories. Our approach was entirely based on consultations with specific groups of stakeholders in three institutions through interviews with specific individuals.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter One


  • Chapter Two

    Potential benefits of digital repositories

  • Chapter Three

    Barriers to embedding digital repositories

  • Chapter Four

    How can these barriers be overcome?

  • Appendix A

    List of interviewees

Research conducted by

The research in this report was prepared for the SHERPA-LEAP Consortium and conducted by RAND Europe.

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