Africa

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Africa, the world’s second-largest, second-most-populous continent, is also the most environmentally diverse, politically divided, and economically underdeveloped. RAND research has not treated Africa as a monolith but has focused on regional and national trends — such as global health, maritime violence and piracy, and the spread of radical Islam  — while situating Africa’s many political conflicts and need for economic growth within a global context.

  • Nigerian midwife

    Project

    Improving Infant and Maternal Health in Rural Nigeria

    Jun 13, 2013

    The BORN Study examines efforts to improve maternal and infant health in Nigeria, where more than 250,000 infants die each year. BORN findings could have wide-ranging impact on health in the region.

Explore Africa

  • Palestinians mourn their relatives, whom medics say were killed by Israeli shelling, at a hospital morgue in the southern Gaza Strip, July 21, 2014

    Blog

    With the Death Toll Rising in Gaza, Is There Any Hope for Peace?

    Casualties are rising in the conflict between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip. Are there any realistic expectations for peace in the region? Who could broker a settlement between Hamas and Israel?

    Jul 22, 2014

  • South African men create a sandbag building for EcoSteps

    Blog

    Could Alternatives Ease the Misery of South Africa's Housing Crisis?

    The government's plan to replace cardboard shacks with cement houses may not be the only route to easing South Africa's housing woes. Increasingly, academic researchers, non-governmental organizations, and private companies are demonstrating pragmatic, low-cost, alternatives.

    Jul 10, 2014

  • black doctor and microscope

    Content

    Exploring the Current State of Health Research in Sub-Saharan Africa

    While funding is the key problem, clinical researchers seeking to combat infectious diseases in sub-Saharan Africa cite the lack of policymaker understanding of the importance of their work as a major barrier, above lack of human resources and lack of infrastructure.

    Jul 3, 2014

  • Northrop Grumman test pilots with arm-mounted controllers after successfully launching a drone combat aircraft on the USS George H. W. Bush, May 14, 2013

    Blog

    Would U.S. Air Power Work in Iraq?

    With the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) making significant gains over the past week, President Obama is reportedly considering whether to deploy U.S. air power to assist Iraq's armed forces. But what would such an intervention mean in practical terms?

    Jun 18, 2014

  • Protesters outside Nigeria's parliament demand security forces search harder for the 200 schoolgirls abducted by Boko Haram

    Blog

    The Risks of Rescue

    As appealing as a successful mission to rescue the 200 school girls held hostage by Boko Haram in Nigeria might appear, the use of U.S. military assets to mount a rescue attempt would be a mistake.

    Jun 13, 2014

  • Congolese woman

    Blog

    First Steps Toward Addressing DR Congo's Rape Crisis

    An effort to address atrocities against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo has fallen short of advocates' hopes for justice. With its focus on criminal prosecution, the strategy failed to consider the weak infrastructure of the judicial system, left victims' needs unmet, and did little to address prevention.

    Jun 11, 2014

  • A child receives polio vaccination during an anti-polio campaign on the outskirts of Jalalabad, Afghanistan

    Blog

    An Outbreak of Outbreaks

    Lately, stories about outbreaks seem to be spreading faster than the diseases themselves. An outbreak of measles in Ohio is just part of an 18-year high of U.S. cases. Meanwhile, polio continues to circulate in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Nigeria, while spreading to other countries.

    Jun 11, 2014

  • Woman attends a health education session in northern Nigeria

    Blog

    Insurance and Incentives: A Dual Approach to Try to Improve Maternal Health in Nigeria

    Less than 5% of Nigerians have insurance; two-thirds of all health care costs are paid out of pocket. When people must pay out of pocket for health care at the point of service, this restricts access, excludes the poorest and most vulnerable, and leads to delays in patients seeking help.

    Jun 10, 2014

  • Journal Article

    INtegration of DEPression Treatment Into HIV Care in Uganda (INDEPTH-Uganda): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    The aims of this trial are to evaluate the implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a task-shifting, protocolized model of antidepressant care for HIV clinics in Uganda.

    Jun 1, 2014

  • Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (2nd R) and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta (R) walk as they arrive to the site of previously burnt ivory, in Nairobi National Park May 10, 2014

    Blog

    In Africa: U.S. Promotes Security, China Does Business

    Africans require both security and economic growth. Global powers like China and the United States do not need to choose between the two when focusing their foreign policy efforts.

    May 31, 2014

  • Double maize yields for Malawian farmer with conservation agriculture

    Blog

    Climate Change, Uncertainty Cast Clouds on Malawi's Food Policies

    Malawi has the highest per capita maize consumption in Africa, but it may need to consider alternatives, taking into greater consideration weather, climate change and water needs.

    May 20, 2014

  • Protesters march in support of the girls kidnapped by members of Boko Haram in front of the Nigerian Embassy in Washington

    Blog

    Nigeria, Boko Haram, and the Difficulty of Rescuing the Kidnapped Girls

    The historical record suggests that when many hostages are involved, rescues are bloody affairs. Early RAND research on hostage situations showed that of all the ways hostages may be killed—during the initial abduction, trying to escape, murdered by their captors or during the rescue—79 percent died during the rescue.

    May 19, 2014

  • Research Brief

    A New Approach to Security and Justice Sector Assistance: An Enhanced Partnership Planning Model

    RAND researchers examined ways to reshape security and justice sector assistance programs, and designed a new approach -- an Enhanced Partnership Planning Model that can be tailored to partner-nation needs and particular U.S. strategic interests.

    May 14, 2014

  • Man being searched at checkpoint

    Report

    Ways to Build Partnerships in the Arab World

    U.S. security assistance has largely been perceived in transactional terms, provided with the expectation that the partner nation will take some action in return that furthers U.S. interests in the region. Instead, security assistance should be seen in terms of building and sustaining relationships.

    May 14, 2014

  • Photo of South African shanty town

    Blog

    In South Africa, Hard Choices on Housing

    South Africans go to the polls today, marking 20 years since apartheid ended and the country's first democratic elections brought the African National Congress (ANC) to power. But while much has changed, many challenges remain, including the developing nation's dire need for housing.

    May 7, 2014

  • Logan Town, Liberia

    Report

    Evaluation of the Population and Poverty Research Initiative (PopPov)

    To what extent has the Population and Poverty Research Initiative (PopPov) achieved its goals of building and advancing the field of economic demography, increasing policymakers' recognition of the value of lowering population growth rates and investing in family planning, and strengthening research capacity in sub-Saharan Africa?

    May 5, 2014

  • A U.S. Navy boat patrols the waters of Nigeria's Lagos harbor, March 24, 2009

    Blog

    Why the Dangerous New Turn for Piracy Matters

    Off the western coast of Africa, just north of the equator, the Gulf of Guinea has endured piracy for decades. But recent spikes in new, more dangerous forms of piracy imply a troubling sense of invincibility in the minds of the perpetrators.

    Apr 29, 2014

  • African mother and baby

    Blog

    Maternal Deaths: Turning the Tide in a Nigerian State

    Bold and innovative approaches are being developed in different parts of the African continent in the quest to reduce maternal mortality. A noteworthy example of this is the Abiye Safe Motherhood program in Ondo State, Nigeria.

    Apr 16, 2014

  • News Release

    Libya Needs More International Support

    The international community's limited approach to post-conflict stabilization of Libya has left the nation struggling and on the brink of civil war.

    Mar 17, 2014

  • Libyans protesting against the General National Congress in Benghazi February 28, 2014

    Report

    Libya Needs More International Support

    The international community's limited approach to post-conflict stabilization of Libya has left the nation struggling and on the brink of civil war. The essential tasks of establishing security, building political and administrative institutions, and restarting the economy were left almost entirely up to Libya's new leaders. No international forces were deployed to keep the peace, in contrast with NATO interventions in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Afghanistan.

    Mar 17, 2014