Americas

  • Journal Article

    Effectiveness of Cognitive Tutor Algebra I at Scale

    This article examines the effectiveness of a technology-based algebra curriculum in a wide variety of middle schools and high schools in seven states.

    Jun 1, 2014

  • Report

    Increasing Numbers of U.S. Army Recruits Enlist Some Years After High School

    More than half of all U.S. Army recruits are choosing to join later in life instead of immediately after high school graduation. Older recruits tend to reenlist and receive promotions at greater rates than their younger peers. Among those surveyed, recruits who enlisted later were more concerned about the domestic job market and less concerned about external factors, such as opposition from family and friends.

    Apr 23, 2014

  • Report

    Evaluating the Impact of the Department of Defense Regional Centers for Security Studies

    The five U.S. Department of Defense Regional Centers for Security Studies have been helping partner nations build strategic capacity for almost 20 years. This study analyzes the centers' impact and the ways in which they assess their programs.

    Apr 23, 2014

  • Report

    RAND Arroyo Center Annual Report 2013

    Describes RAND Arroyo Center's research activities in FY13 and summarizes noteworthy studies performed throughout the year.

    Apr 23, 2014

  • Blog

    Make HOT Lanes Permanent

    The first HOT lanes in L.A. have improved traffic flow and travel time reliability, are fair to users of the facilities, have improved transit service and have generated revenue needed to fund those improvements from voluntary toll payments.

    Apr 23, 2014

  • News Release

    Increasing Numbers of U.S. Army Recruits Enlist Some Years After High School

    More than half of all U.S. Army recruits are choosing to join later in life instead of immediately after high school graduation, but these older recruits tend to reenlist and be promoted at greater rates than their younger peers.

    Apr 23, 2014

  • Research Brief

    Healing Medical Product Innovation

    Expensive new technology is a leading driver of health care spending increases. Encouraging the creation of technologies that could improve health and reduce spending—or that provide large-enough benefits to warrant any extra spending—could help turn the tide.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • Blog

    Health Care Innovation: The Challenge Ahead

    Substantial progress could be made toward the goals of reducing spending and increasing value by altering the financial incentives faced by inventors, investors, payers, providers, and patients.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • Blog

    Improving DHS Accountability for Acquisitions

    As the House of Representatives considers legislation that would reform the Department of Homeland Security's acquisitions process, an important issues come to the forefront—the need for accountability in the acquisitions process.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • Blog

    Tracking the ACA with the RAND Health Reform Opinion Study

    The HROS uses panel data to track changes in public opinion regarding the Affordable Care Act and insurance coverage. By surveying the same respondents each month, the HROS observes not only aggregate changes, but also individual changes in opinion or insurance coverage over time.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • Project

    Redirecting Medical Product Innovation

    Realigning incentives for inventors, investors, payers, providers, and patients could yield medical products that reduce spending and improve health.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • News Release

    Smarter Incentives for Inventors Could Spur Medical Innovation, Cut U.S. Health Care Spending

    To help rein in massive health care spending, U.S. policymakers should urgently find ways to incentivize pharmaceutical companies and device makers to develop products that produce more value.

    Apr 22, 2014

  • Blog

    The U.S. Army Must Remain Prepared for Battle

    Converting the Army into a force suited only for homeland defense or humanitarian missions abroad, without the ability to fight sophisticated foes as part of a joint force, would result in an unprepared Army.

    Apr 18, 2014

  • Blog

    RAND Health Reform Opinion Study: Few Changes After Open Enrollment

    At the close of the ACA's open enrollment period, no significant changes in opinion were observed in the RAND Health Reform Opinion Study. This may be because open enrollment has no bearing on the health insurance of many people.

    Apr 16, 2014

  • Blog

    After Boston, Beware DIY Attacks: Front & Center

    Orlando Sentinel editorial writer Darryl E. Owens interviewed Brian Michael Jenkins, senior adviser to the president of RAND. They discussed last year's Boston Marathon bombing and the current threat of terrorist acts in the United States.

    Apr 16, 2014

  • Report

    Methods for Identifying Part Quality Issues and Estimating Their Cost with an Application Using the UH-60

    This research report demonstrates how the Army can use readily available demand and end item maintenance history to identify potential issues with repair part or process quality and estimate their associated incremental costs.

    Apr 14, 2014

  • Blog

    Book Review: A Reporter Analyzes the Driving Role of Pakistan in the Afghan War

    With its focus on Pakistan, Gall's “The Wrong Enemy” is a valuable contribution to a body of work on the American war in Afghanistan that has become stale and hackneyed. It provides a raw, unvarnished look at one of the darkest and least understood parts of the war.

    Apr 11, 2014

  • Blog

    Don't Chop the Air Force — Look to the Reserves

    The Air Force's latest budget plan proposes to cut 25,000 airmen. The recommendations made by the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (NCSAF) offer an alternative — and less risky — way forward.

    Apr 11, 2014

  • Blog

    Russia Is Outmanned and Outgunned

    Yes, the United States has many fewer forces in Europe than it did in 1989. But Russia has none, its allies have all switched sides, and its military is but a shadow of what it was 25 years ago.

    Apr 10, 2014

  • News Release

    Extending Terrorism Insurance Program Could Save Federal Government Money After Future Attacks

    The Terrorism Risk Insurance Act will expire soon and Congress is considering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. In a terrorist attack with losses up to $50 billion, the federal government would spend more helping to cover losses than if it had continued to support a national terrorism risk insurance program.

    Apr 10, 2014