Corrections

  • Blog

    Sending Prisoners to College Will Save You Money

    Correctional education works for states because it saves money and shrinks prison populations. It works for prisoners, the public, law enforcement, and the judicial system because educated prisoners are less likely to return to their criminal ways once released.

    Apr 11, 2014

  • Report

    Prison-Based Education Declined During Economic Downturn

    Large states cut spending on prison education programs by an average of 10 percent between the 2009 and 2012 fiscal years, while medium-sized states cut spending by 20 percent. While the drop appears to have resulted from budget cuts prompted by the economic downturn, evidence suggests that the curtailment of prison education could increase prison system costs in the longer term.

    Mar 18, 2014

  • Blog

    California's Misguided Approach

    Despite the frequency with which people are convicted of multiple DUI offenses, California continues to require that all individuals with a DUI attend a 30- or 60-hour education program. However, these programs aren't that effective.

    Mar 17, 2014

  • Research Brief

    Correctional Education in the United States: How Effective Is It, and How Can We Move the Field Forward?

    Assesses the effectiveness of correctional education for both incarcerated adults and juveniles, presents the results of a survey of U.S. state correctional education directors, and offers recommendations for improving correctional education.

    Mar 4, 2014

  • News Release

    Prison-Based Education Declined During Economic Downturn; More Work Is Needed to Better Focus Spending

    State-level spending on prison education programs declined sharply during the economic downturn, with the sharpest drop occurring in states that incarcerate the most prisoners.

    Feb 18, 2014

  • Project

    Program Examines European Communities, Safety, and Justice Policy

    RAND Europe's research on communities, safety and justice policy supports strategy and decisionmaking among those interested in supporting local communities and understanding and reducing crime and violence.

    Feb 6, 2014

  • Research Brief

    Are Prisoners Serving Time or Wasting Time?

    A comprehensive literature review enabled the examination of the association between correctional education and reductions in recidivism, improvements in employment upon release from prison, and the cost-effectiveness of correctional education.

    Nov 26, 2013

  • Periodical

    Serving Time or Wasting Time?

    Prisoners say they need education and job training to reintegrate into society. They're right: 68 percent of inmates in state prisons lack a high school diploma. Correctional education programs improve job prospects upon release from prison, reduce recidivism, and save taxpayer dollars.

    Nov 26, 2013

  • Blog

    To Stop Prisons' Revolving Door

    If California wants to reduce its prison population, it needs to address recidivism, and the best way to do this is through education and job training. Cutting education and vocational training may seem like a tempting way to plug short-term budget gaps, but it actually ends up costing the system more over time.

    Sep 16, 2013

  • News Release

    Education and Vocational Training in Prisons Reduces Recidivism, Improves Job Outlook

    Inmates who participate in correctional education programs have a 43 percent lower odds of returning to prison than those who do not. Employment after release is 13 percent higher among prisoners who participated in either academic or vocational education programs than those who did not.

    Aug 22, 2013

  • Research Brief

    How Effective is Correctional Education?

    One strategy to counter recidivism is to provide education to inmates while incarcerated so that they have the knowledge, training, and skills to support a successful return to their communities.

    Aug 22, 2013

  • Report

    Education and Vocational Training in Prisons Reduces Recidivism, Improves Job Outlook

    Inmates who participate in correctional education programs have a 43 percent lower odds of returning to prison than those who do not. Employment after release is 13 percent higher among prisoners who participated in either academic or vocational education programs than those who did not.

    Aug 22, 2013

  • Blog

    New Approach to Prison and the War on Drugs

    If you want to reduce cocaine consumption and drug-related crime, you get more bang for the buck if you put money into treatment rather than paying for the increase in incarceration produced by federal mandatory minimum sentences, writes Beau Kilmer.

    Aug 13, 2013

  • Report

    Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2011-2012 Report

    This annual report for the California Board of State and Community Corrections measures the success of Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act programs and initiatives for six state-mandated outcome measures and county-mandated supplemental measures.

    Aug 12, 2013

  • Blog

    Advancing Social Outcomes: Private Investors Could Be Part of the Solution

    Under a Social Impact Bond, private investors — rather than the government — provide up-front funding for programs that tackle such challenges as recidivism or homelessness. If these programs succeed, the government pays some of the savings back to the investors.

    May 14, 2013

  • Research Brief

    An Innovative Way to Curb Problem Drinking: South Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety Project

    South Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety Project, in which individuals with alcohol-involved offenses submit to breathalyzer tests twice per day or wear an alcohol monitoring bracelet at all times, reduced repeat DUI arrests at the county level by 12 percent.

    Dec 12, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Frequent Alcohol Testing Program Reduces DUI and Domestic Violence Arrests

    In its first six years, an innovative alcohol monitoring program called the South Dakota 24/7 Sobriety Project reduced county-level repeat DUI arrests by 12 percent and domestic violence arrests by 9 percent.

    Dec 6, 2012

  • Project

    Correctional Education Project Examines Education for Incarcerated Adults and Youth

    The RAND Correctional Education Project aims to evaluate and improve educational methods for incarcerated adults and juveniles. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA).

    Sep 20, 2012

  • Blog

    A Final Word on the NDAA

    While I have no doubt of Levin's determination to protect the constitutional rights of American citizens, incremental adjustments and seemingly small compromises, each sensible under the circumstances, can have a cumulative effect that erodes the very liberty we are trying to protect, writes Brian Michael Jenkins.

    May 7, 2012

  • Blog

    The NDAA Makes It Harder to Fight Terrorism

    Much of the debate over this bill has focused on the political issue of executive authority versus rule of law. In doing so it has overlooked the indirect and insidious effects the new law may have on the United States' largely successful counterterrorist campaign, writes Brian Michael Jenkins.

    Feb 1, 2012