Over two million adults are incarcerated in U.S. prisons, and each year more than 700,000 are released and return to communities. Within three years, 40 percent will be reincarcerated. RAND research has shown that correctional education programs improve inmates' future job prospects, reduce recidivism, and save taxpayer dollars. RAND also explores the juvenile justice system and innovations that can help corrections agencies respond more effectively in their role to protect the public.

  • Thinkstock_Fotolia_53041025


    Prison-Based Education Declined During Economic Downturn

    Feb 18, 2014

    Large states cut spending on prison education programs by an average of 10 percent between the 2009 and 2012 fiscal years, while medium-sized states cut spending by 20 percent. While the drop appears to have resulted from budget cuts prompted by the economic downturn, evidence suggests that the curtailment of prison education could increase prison system costs in the longer term.

  • Fotolia_9971633_Subscription_Monthly_XL


    If You Want Ex-Cons to Be 'Productive Members of Society,' Ban the Box

    Sep 5, 2014

    When an inmate is released, you often hear Americans say that he's “paid his debt” and can now become “a productive member of society.” But the reality is ex-cons pay for their crimes long after sentences end. On the outside, the stigma of incarceration makes it extremely difficult to land a job.

Explore Corrections