Defense Infrastructure

The buildings and permanent installations necessary for the support, deployment, and operation of a nation's military constitute its defense infrastructure. RAND research has examined the structure and needs of U.S. and allied military facilities, provided recommendations concerning base realignment, and investigated ways to maximize the capabilities and utilization of existing resources and to define future infrastructure needs.

  • Hercules aircraft parked on the tarmac at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Ginowan on Okinawa

    Blog

    Should the U.S. Move the Marines to Guam?

    The option to permanently base Marines on Guam should hinge on the benefits of the location and the costs. Guam scores poorly on both counts and better options exist. However, previous guidance provided to the Marine Corps constrains consideration of such options.

    Feb 28, 2014

  • Airmen from the 748th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron offload one of the two HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters from a C-17 Globemaster III at Royal Air Force Mildenhall, United Kingdom, Sept. 19, 2013

    Report

    A Cost Analysis of the U.S. Air Force Overseas Posture

    While it does cost more to maintain force structures and installations overseas rather than in the United States, the total cost of doing so for the Air Force's current overseas posture is small relative to the Air Force's overall budget.

    Sep 16, 2013

  • Report

    Key Trends That Will Shape Army Installations of Tomorrow

    Assesses how future trends external to Army installations may affect the Army's ability to provide quality installation services and infrastructure.

    Jun 6, 2013

  • world map showing U.S. overseas bases

    Report

    The Strategic Benefits, Risks, and Costs of U.S. Military Presence Overseas

    While the DoD is under pressure to reduce costs, meaningful savings from overseas posture changes would require choosing from a small set of options, each presenting benefit trade-offs. U.S. military presence contributes to assurance of allies, deterrence, contingency responsiveness, and security cooperation.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • Research Brief

    U.S. Overseas Military Posture: Relative Costs and Strategic Benefits

    In an environment of fiscal constraints and shifting strategic needs, policymakers should carefully weigh the strategic capability effects, relative costs, and risks associated with potential changes to U.S. overseas military posture.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • Report

    Obtaining Life-Cycle Cost-Effective Facilities in the Department of Defense

    The Department of Defense constructs, operates, and maintains numerous facilities. This report shares RAND's description and assessment of the process used to obtain life-cycle cost-effective facilities and how it affects construction options.

    Mar 5, 2013

  • satellite image of the United States at night

    Report

    Capabilities-Based Planning Can Enhance Energy Security at DoD Installations

    Energy security strategies are needed because DoD installations rely on the U.S. commercial electricity grid which is vulnerable to disruption from natural hazards and actor-induced outages, such as physical or cyber attacks.

    Feb 20, 2013

  • tanker_war_090501-F-0304D-004

    Report

    U.S. Global Defense Posture, 1783–2011

    Debates over the U.S. global defense posture are not new. As policymakers today evaluate the U.S. forward military presence, it is important that they understand how and why the U.S. global posture has changed in the past. This historical overview has important implications for current policy and future efforts to develop an American military strategy, in particular the scope, size, and type of military presence overseas.

    Jan 14, 2013

  • News Release

    Looming Strategic Choices for U.S. Overseas Military Presence

    Since World War II, the United States has relied on a global network of military bases and forces to protect its interests and those of its allies. But the international environment has changed greatly and economic concerns have risen, leading some to debate just what America's role should now be in the world.

    Sep 12, 2012

  • Report

    Looming Strategic Choices for U.S. Overseas Military Presence

    Since World War II, the United States has relied on a global network of military bases and forces to protect its interests and those of its allies. But the international environment has changed greatly and economic concerns have risen, leading some to debate just what America's role should now be in the world.

    Sep 11, 2012

  • Blog

    DoD Renewable Fuels Investment Premature

    Technological development challenges suggest that it is highly unlikely that advanced approaches for producing hydrotreated renewable oils suitable for military applications will constitute an important fraction of the commercial fuel market until well beyond the next decade, writes Keith Crane.

    May 24, 2012

  • News Release

    Obituary: Glenn A. Kent, National Security Strategist, Senior RAND Research Fellow

    Lt. Gen. Glenn A. Kent, a strategist, analyst and teacher whose career spanned World War II, the Cold War and the post-Cold War eras, died April 25.

    Apr 26, 2012

  • Research Brief

    Standing Up a More Capable Joint Task Force Headquarters

    The U.S. Army needs to improve its ability to command and control joint, interagency, and multinational forces in diverse environments, and to prepare Army headquarters to perform as components of, or headquarters for, joint task forces.

    Nov 18, 2011

  • Report

    Targets for Marine Corps Purchasing and Supply Management Initiatives: Spend Analysis Findings

    Moore et al. provide a first-order analysis of Marine Corps purchases and Defense Logistics Agency purchases on behalf of the Marine Corps, revealing many indicators of opportunities and challenges for purchasing and supply management initiatives.

    Oct 13, 2011

  • Report

    Preserving Range and Airspace Access for the Air Force Mission: Striving for a Strategic Vantage Point

    Air Force range managers schedule the infrastructure and airspace needed for realistic testing and training activities, which requires adequate information about the proposed maneuvers, the acceptable context, and understanding of the goals.

    May 17, 2011

  • Report

    Influences on the Adoption of Multifactor Authentication

    Passwords are proving less and less capable of protecting computer systems from abuse. Multifactor authentication (MFA) — which combines something you know (e.g., a PIN), something you have (e.g., a token), and/or something you are (e.g., a fingerprint) — is increasingly being required. This report investigates why organizations choose to adopt or not adopt MFA — and where they choose to use it.

    Apr 15, 2011

  • Report

    The Effects of Changing Aircraft Carrier Procurement Schedules

    The Secretary of Defense's plans to shift Navy aircraft carrier acquisition to every five years should have little impact on force structure and the industrial base in the next decade—but after that, the force structure shrinks, as does the chance of meeting goals for the number of deployed aircraft carriers.

    Mar 21, 2011

  • Report

    A Methodology for Comparing Costs and Benefits of Management Alternatives for F-22 Sustainment

    The U.S. Air Force asked RAND Project AIR FORCE to perform a congressionally required assessment of contractor versus organic management of F-22 sustainment to determine the most cost-effective approach, the methodology for which is described here.

    Feb 16, 2011

  • UK fixed wing aircraft

    Report

    Sustaining Key Skills in the UK Military Aircraft Industry

    The UK Ministry of Defence's Fixed Wing Sector Strategy Board commissioned RAND Europe to assist in the development of a strategy and sustainment plan for the military fixed wing sector.

    Jan 31, 2011

  • News Release

    No Direct Military Benefit from Use of Alternative Fuels by Armed Forces

    The increased use of alternative fuels by the U.S. military will not have the anticipated direct benefit to the nation's armed forces based on a new RAND study. As an alternative, the military may consider efforts to use energy more efficiently, thereby saving money and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Jan 24, 2011