Economic Burden Of Health Care

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    Project

    Dementia Blueprint

    Jun 23, 2014

    Annual costs of dementia exceed those of cancer and heart disease and will only continue to rise as the nation's population ages. Key policy options can help strengthen and improve long-term services and supports for those with dementia and their caregivers.

Explore Economic Burden Of Health Care

  • A son, father, and grandfather fishing from a dock

    Blog

    Demographics Add Urgency for Action on Dementia Long-Term Care

    Dementia takes a huge toll on those afflicted with it but also has major consequences for those who must care for them. More than 15 million Americans provide care for loved ones with dementia—tending to their daily, routine needs and ensuring their medical needs are met.

    Jul 28, 2014

  • Report

    Dementia's Mounting Toll on the U.S. Economy

    Dementia costs Americans hundreds of billions of dollars per year, and the annual cost could top half a trillion by 2040 due to the 'graying' of the U.S. population.

    May 27, 2014

  • Close up of pills/drugs on US dollar health care spending

    Blog

    Is the ACA Keeping a Lid on Growth in Healthcare Spending?

    Some point to the healthcare spending slowdown as an early success of the Affordable Care Act. Others warn that it's merely a hangover from the recession, and that the inevitable spending rebound will be exacerbated by the ACA coverage expansions.

    Apr 3, 2014

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks at the G8 Dementia Summit

    Blog

    A Global Focus on Dementia

    The Group of 8 industrial nations is convening a special session to seek an international approach to dementia research at a time the disease is being recognized as a 21st century global health crisis of historic proportions.

    Dec 11, 2013

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    Research Brief

    Will the Affordable Care Act Make Health Care More Affordable?

    For most lower-income people who obtain coverage as a result of the Affordable Care Act, health care spending will fall. But spending by some newly insured higher-income people will increase because they will be now paying insurance premiums.

    Dec 11, 2013

  • doctor examining newborn baby

    Blog

    Will the Affordable Care Act Make Health Care More Affordable?

    Out-of-pocket spending on health care will decrease for both the newly insured as well as for those changing their source of insurance. These decreases will be largest for those who would otherwise be uninsured.

    Oct 1, 2013

  • News Release

    Affordable Care Act Will Reduce Out-of-Pocket Medical Spending for Many Americans

    The Affordable Care Act will have a varied impact on health spending by individuals and families, depending primarily on their income and whether they would have been uninsured in 2016 without the program.

    Oct 1, 2013

  • a middle aged woman checking out at a medical reception counter

    Report

    Affordable Care Act Will Reduce Out-of-Pocket Medical Spending for Many Americans

    The Affordable Care Act will have a varied impact on health spending by individuals and families, depending primarily on their income and whether they would have been uninsured in 2016 without the program.

    Oct 1, 2013

  • elderly person's hands on walking cane

    Testimony

    The Monetary Costs of Dementia in the United States

    How do today's costs for treating patients with Alzheimer's disease compare to those of decades past?

    Jul 12, 2013

  • A woman is wheeled through an emergency department on a gurney.

    Blog

    Covering Emergency Care for Young Adults: Is the ACA Doing Its Job?

    The dependent coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act is working as intended, say Andrew Mulcahy and Katherine Harris. In 2011, it spared individuals and hospitals from $147 million in emergency room costs.

    Jun 5, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Fair Pricing Law Prompts Most California Hospitals to Adopt Policies to Protect Uninsured Patients from High Charges

    Most CA hospitals have adopted financial assistance policies to provide more affordable care for the uninsured. Ninety-seven percent of hospitals say they offer free care to uninsured patients with incomes at or below the federal poverty level.

    Jun 1, 2013

  • News Release

    Health Reform Shields Young Adults from Emergency Medical Costs

    A new federal law allowing young adults to remain on their parents' medical insurance through age 25 has shielded them, their families, and hospitals from the full financial consequences of serious medical emergencies.

    May 29, 2013

  • Couple reviewing finances with an advisor

    Blog

    The Cost of Dementia: Who Will Pay?

    It is time for the government in partnership with industry to return to the drawing board to craft a plan that will provide protection for the more than 9 million people who will need care for dementia by 2040, writes Michael D. Hurd.

    May 1, 2013

  • Young woman and grandfather sitting hand in hand at table

    Blog

    Dementia's Growing Cost to Caregivers

    At the rate that the U.S. population is aging, the total cost of dementia could reach half a trillion dollars a year by 2040. Those who care for impaired relatives and friends are acutely aware of the effects of dementia, and unfortunately they are all too familiar with its costs, writes Kathleen J. Mullen.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • U.S. Army medical researchers take part in World Malaria Day 2010, Kisumu, Kenya April 25, 2010

    Blog

    The Economic Promise of Malaria Reduction

    Better understanding of how malaria reduction affects different households, regions, and economic sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa could allow policymakers to assess alternative intervention strategies and allocate resources more efficiently and effectively.

    Apr 24, 2013

  • an elderly woman with a caretaker

    Testimony

    The Monetary Costs of Dementia in the United States

    Identifying the costs of dementia is challenging because persons who have it are likely to have co-existing chronic health problems, making isolating the costs among other costs difficult. Also, it is unclear how to attribute a monetary cost to informal caregiving.

    Apr 24, 2013

  • an elderly couple, man possibly with dementia

    News Release

    Cost of Dementia Tops $159 Billion Annually in the United States

    The monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges from $159 billion to $215 billion annually, making the disease more costly to the nation than either heart disease or cancer. The greatest cost is associated with providing institutional and home-based long-term care rather than medical services.

    Apr 3, 2013

  • an elderly couple, man possibly with dementia

    Journal Article

    Cost of Dementia Tops $159 Billion Annually in the United States

    The monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges from $159 billion to $215 billion annually, making the disease more costly to the nation than either heart disease or cancer. The greatest cost is associated with providing institutional and home-based long-term care rather than medical services.

    Apr 1, 2013

  • hepatitis virus

    Report

    Projecting the Healthcare and Economic Burden of Hepatitis C in the UK

    Hepatitis C is a leading cause of chronic liver disease, end-stage cirrhosis and liver cancer. To contribute to better understanding of the burden associated with HCV infection in the UK, RAND Europe estimated the prevalence and the number of deaths that can be attributed to HCV-infection and assessed the healthcare and societal costs that are associated with HCV infection under different scenarios of diagnosis and treatment rates. The findings suggest that increasing treatment rates of those with HCV infection is associated with a gain in productivity.

    Jan 11, 2013