Nutrition Policy

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  • salad

    Content

    How to Make Restaurants Healthier

    Sep 11, 2013

    A set of recommendations for healthier restaurants could help consumers limit their risk of diet-related chronic disease by making informed decisions about meals away from home.

  • Benjamin Lesczynski, 8, of New York, takes a sip of a "Big Gulp" while protesting the proposed "soda ban" suggested by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, July 9, 2012

    Commentary

    Let's Regulate Food Like We Do Alcohol

    May 19, 2014

    To help people avoid overeating, the kinds of policies effective in controlling alcohol consumption should be applied to food—standardizing portion sizes, limiting impulse marketing and reducing the convenience and salience of foods most closely associated with obesity and chronic diseases.

Explore Nutrition Policy

  • Man in a restaurant looking at a menu

    Commentary

    Lack of Uniformity in Menu Labeling Could Confuse Consumers

    A bill recently passed by the House would loosen nutritional labeling requirements, making it more complicated for consumers to make informed decisions about what to eat when dining out.

    Mar 15, 2016

  • Pasta with chicken, mushrooms, and alfredo sauce

    Commentary

    It's Hard to Eat Less When There Is Too Much on Your Plate

    A recent review of 72 studies on portion sizes confirmed that when served more than they need, people eat more than they should. And there is clear evidence that portion sizes are dramatically larger than those served in the 1980s.

    Feb 22, 2016

  • Lady using a modern vending machine

    Commentary

    After Trans Fats, Target America's Overeating

    In June, the FDA gave manufacturers three years to remove artificial trans fat from the food supply. This is an important step, but solving the problem of diet-related chronic diseases is much more complex than banning a single additive.

    Jul 10, 2015

  • A bacon double cheeseburger with fries, pickles, and tomato on the side

    Commentary

    Regulators Should Insist Food Providers “First, Do No Harm”

    Everyone needs food, water, and shelter, yet society offers protective standards and regulations for just two of these three essentials. Food regulations focus on preventing illnesses like botulism, but when it comes to chronic diseases like obesity and diabetes, regulations offer little protection to U.S. consumers.

    Apr 8, 2015

  • News Release

    No Evidence That Los Angeles Fast-Food Curbs Have Improved Diets or Cut Obesity

    A Los Angeles ordinance designed to curb obesity in low-income areas by restricting the opening of new fast-food restaurants has failed to reduce fast-food consumption or obesity. Since the restrictions were passed in 2008, overweight and obesity rates in neighborhoods targeted by the law have increased faster than in other parts of the city or other parts of the county.

    Mar 19, 2015

  • Customers holding fast food in South Los Angeles in August 2008 said they weren't planning to give it up

    Journal Article

    LA Fast-Food Ban Did Not Improve Diets or Cut Obesity

    A Los Angeles ordinance designed to curb obesity in low-income areas by restricting the opening of new fast-food restaurants has failed to reduce fast-food consumption or obesity. Since the restrictions were passed in 2008, overweight and obesity rates in neighborhoods targeted by the law have increased faster than in other parts of the city or other parts of the county.

    Mar 17, 2015

  • Woman comparing soda labels in a supermarket

    Commentary

    Supermarkets Are the Problem

    Thirty percent of all supermarket sales can be attributed to end-of-aisle displays, where retailers have placed more foods that increase the risk of obesity and chronic diseases. Relocating those foods to less conspicuous places would still allow those who want them to get them, but the decision to buy would be deliberate rather than impulsive.

    Feb 26, 2015

  • Shopping basket in supermarket

    Commentary

    What's Behind the Obesity Epidemic? Easily Accessible Food, and Lots of It

    That no group is immune to rising obesity rates suggests that universal environmental factors are driving the trend. The clearest change concerns food availability and cost.

    Jul 22, 2014

  • Benjamin Lesczynski, 8, of New York, takes a sip of a "Big Gulp" while protesting the proposed "soda ban" suggested by New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, July 9, 2012

    Commentary

    Let's Regulate Food Like We Do Alcohol

    To help people avoid overeating, the kinds of policies effective in controlling alcohol consumption should be applied to food—standardizing portion sizes, limiting impulse marketing and reducing the convenience and salience of foods most closely associated with obesity and chronic diseases.

    May 19, 2014

  • Nutrition facts on a microwave popcorn box

    Commentary

    The FDA Ban on Trans Fat Should Be Just the Beginning

    Most people lack the information they need to judge or track the quantity and quality of the nutrients they consume. The FDA should take a disease prevention approach — as it is currently doing with trans fat — in promoting standards that address how all foods are prepared and served away from home.

    Nov 26, 2013

  • salad

    Content

    How to Make Restaurants Healthier

    A set of recommendations for healthier restaurants could help consumers limit their risk of diet-related chronic disease by making informed decisions about meals away from home.

    Sep 11, 2013

  • pizza menu

    Report

    Addressing the Obesity Epidemic Through Restaurant Standards

    A set of common-sense guidelines discouraging restaurant serving practices that increase caloric consumption or undermine a nutritious diet could help combat America's obesity epidemic.

    Sep 5, 2013

  • father and son shopping for produce

    Commentary

    Eating Better for Less

    A combination of factors could slow the U.S. obesity epidemic while also improving overall nutritional well-being: lowering prices on healthier food, initiatives to control portion sizes, and a long-term campaign to support better food quality.

    May 28, 2013

  • Journal Article

    A National Evaluation of the Impact of State Policies on Competitive Foods in Schools

    This article evaluates the impact of 2 types of state-level policies on the availability of competitive foods in a national sample of schools.

    Apr 1, 2013

  • fruits and vegetables

    News Release

    Discounts on Healthy Foods Can Improve Diet Quality; First Result from a National Program

    Lowering the costs of healthy foods in supermarkets increases the amount of fruits, vegetables, and whole grain foods that people eat, while also appearing to reduce consumption of nutritionally less-desirable foods.

    Mar 19, 2013

  • Supermarket clerk with clipboard and pen

    Journal Article

    Food Policy Research: We Need Better Measurement, Better Study Designs, and Reasonable and Measured Actions Based on the Available Evidence

    The authors' findings support restricting the development of fast-food outlets and attracting grocery stores, and are committed to additional research that overcomes the limitations of large studies.

    Jan 1, 2013

  • Journal Article

    A Cash-Back Rebate Program for Healthy Food Purchases in South Africa: Results from Scanner Data

    This study examines the effect of a price reduction for healthy food items on household grocery shopping behavior among members of South Africa's largest health plan.

    Jan 1, 2013

  • Journal Article

    The Effect of School District Nutrition Policies on Dietary Intake and Overweight: A Synthetic Control Approach

    This paper evaluates the impact of an early nutrition policy, Los Angeles Unified School District's food-and-beverage standards of 2004, using two large datasets on food intake and physical measures.

    Jan 1, 2013

  • grocery checkout

    Content

    Is Impulse Marketing a Public Health Risk?

    Impulse marketing—like candy at a supermarket checkout line—influences our food choices in a way that is largely automatic and out of our conscious control, which affects our risk of diet-related chronic diseases.

    Oct 17, 2012

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    Commentary

    Can New York City's Soda Ban Improve Our Choices and Outcomes?

    Much of the talk has focused on how New York City's ban on sugary drinks, intended to curb obesity by improving dietary choices for consumers, will restrict individuals’ options. Of course, even after the ban, consumers can still buy a second soda. But they might want to take a moment to think about the consequences before doing so, writes Chloe Bird.

    Sep 18, 2012