Taiwan

Taiwan became the primary stronghold of the Republic of China following the Communist party's rise in mainland China in 1949. RAND has analyzed shifts in U.S. diplomatic and military policy toward Taiwan and the People's Republic of China (PRC) over the decades and, in recent years, has examined Taiwan's rapid economic development, gradual political liberalization, and efforts to achieve independence from the PRC.

  • Taiwan-made MK-30 rockets are launched from Thunderbolt-2000 multiple rocket launchers during the annual Han Kuang military exercise in Penghu, west of Taiwan

    Commentary

    Taiwan Forced to Rethink Its Air Defense Strategy

    Taiwan's defense problem is challenging, but it will spend a considerable sum on air defense capabilities in the coming years, and those investments could be made much more effective.

    Apr 14, 2016

  • Cover of RAND report RR1051: Three "Flanker" Aircraft

    Report

    Air Defense Options for Taiwan

    Taiwan's proximity to China and advanced PLA capabilities force Taiwan to rethink its air defense strategy. Taiwan could downsize and shift its fighter aircraft force to focus on coercive scenarios, increase its investment in surface-to-air missiles, and dedicate its surface-based air defense to supporting other defensive operations.

    Apr 5, 2016

  • Journal Article

    Social Environment, Life Challenge, and Health Among the Elderly in Taiwan

    We use an ongoing longitudinal survey of elderly Taiwanese to examine the linkages among health, the social environment, and exposure to life challenge.

    Feb 9, 2016

  • Congressional Briefing Podcast

    Multimedia

    United States and China: Trends in Military Competition

    In this October 2015 congressional briefing, Eric Heginbotham discusses relative U.S. and Chinese military capabilities, including the evolution of Chinese military capabilities, steps the United States can take to limit the impact of a growing Chinese military on deterrence, and other U.S. strategic interests.

    Oct 5, 2015

  • us-china-scorecard

    Project

    An Interactive Look at the U.S.-China Military Scorecard

    To advance the public debate, RAND Project AIR FORCE used open, unclassified sources to compile 'The U.S.-China Military Scorecard: Forces, Geography, and the Evolving Balance of Power.' Use this interactive graphic to explore the operational areas covered in the report.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • News Release

    China's Military Modernization Increasingly Challenges U.S. Defense Capabilities in Asia

    Although China continues to lag behind the United States in terms of aggregate military hardware and operational skills, it has improved its capabilities relative to those of the U.S. in many critical areas. Moreover, China does not need to catch up fully in order to challenge U.S. ability to conduct effective military operations near the Chinese mainland.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • Maintainers prepare F-16s for training flights at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea, August 15, 2013

    Research Brief

    Chinese Attacks on U.S. Air Bases in Asia: An Assessment of Relative Capabilities

    China has the most active ballistic-missile program in the world. It has made rapid and substantial relative improvements in its ability to disrupt or degrade U.S. air operations by attacking air bases.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group, en route to the Western Pacific Ocean

    Research Brief

    Chinese Threats to U.S. Surface Ships

    China has rapidly improved its ability to reliably locate and attack U.S. carrier-strike groups at distances of up to 2,000 kilometers from its coast in a possible military conflict.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • U.S. Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Chinese army Gen. Fang Fenghui, China's chief of the general staff, salute during a ceremony in Beijing, April 22, 2013

    Research Brief

    Tallying the U.S.-China Military Scorecard

    A set of “scorecards” assesses the relative capabilities of U.S. and Chinese military forces in diverse types of conflict, at varying distances from the Chinese mainland, and at different points in time.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • U.S and Korean fighter aircraft fly above Jik-Do Island near South Korea, August 14, 2013

    Research Brief

    U.S. and Chinese Air Superiority Capabilities

    The United States maintains unparalleled air-to-air capabilities. But the modernization of Chinese air forces, combined with the difficulties of operating over long distances in Asia, would make it more and more challenging for the United States to gain air superiority during the beginning of a possible conflict with China.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy recruits march during a parade in Qingdao, Shandong province, December 5, 2013

    Report

    China's Military Modernization Increasingly Challenges U.S. Defense Capabilities in Asia

    Although China continues to lag behind the United States in terms of aggregate military hardware and operational skills, it has improved its capabilities relative to those of the U.S. in many critical areas. Moreover, China does not need to catch up fully in order to challenge U.S. ability to conduct effective military operations near the Chinese mainland.

    Sep 14, 2015

  • Senior couple on a park bench looking at a tablet

    Commentary

    Aging in Asia: Can the 'Tigers' Continue to Roar?

    Changing demographics will force Japan and the “Asian Tigers”—Hong Kong, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan—to find ways to remain economically dynamic while increasingly looking after their elderly. How might public policy help accomplish this?

    Jun 16, 2015

  • Grandpa and grandson playing a chess game

    Journal Article

    Examining Physical Function and Mortality of Aging Taiwanese

    The Survey of Health and Living Status of the Middle-Aged and Elderly in Taiwan measured difficulty with one or more of seven physical functions. A group-based trajectory model identified common trajectories.

    Mar 1, 2014

  • Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Minister Wang Yu-chi and his delegation leave after visiting the Sun Yat-sen mausoleum in Nanjing, Jiangsu province

    Journal Article

    China and Taiwan: Balance of Rivalry with Weapons of Mass Democratization

    An analysis exposes fragility in Beijing's soft power—the limitations of the Chinese Communist Party's political legitimacy and vulnerabilities in China's rise. The example that illustrates a real Achilles's heel hits close to home: the issue of Taiwan.

    Jan 1, 2014

  • Journal Article

    Trends in Late-Life Disability in Taiwan, 1989-2007: The Roles of Education, Environment, and Technology

    This study assessing trends in late-life disability in the emerging economy of Taiwan showed that limitations in seeing, hearing, and instrumental activities of daily living declined.

    Nov 1, 2011

  • Report

    New Opportunities and Challenges for Taiwan's Security

    A November 2009 conference brought together leading experts to consider how political, economic, and military factors are likely to shape Taiwan's security in the coming decade. The papers represented a range of viewpoints and analyses.

    Mar 30, 2011

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    Journal Article

    The Impact of Universal National Health Insurance on Population Health in Taiwan

    A study of Taiwan's system of universal National Health Insurance (NHI) found its introduction was associated in a reduction in deaths considered amenable to health care, particularly among those age groups least likely to have been insured previously.

    Aug 4, 2010

  • Report

    A Question of Balance: Political Context and Military Aspects of the China-Taiwan Dispute

    While relations between China and Taiwan are warmer now than in recent years, China still feels entitled to use force to prevent Taiwan from becoming independent. Meanwhile, the modernizing of China's military may call into question the U.S.' ability to defend Taiwan against a large-scale Chinese attack.

    Jul 23, 2009

  • Research Brief

    How Taiwan's Status Is Resolved Will Determine Whether U.S.-China Relations Are Cooperative or Hostile

    This research brief examines how U.S.-China relations would be affected by the manner in which Taiwan's status is resolved.

    May 22, 2007

  • Report

    What Are the Impacts of Resolving Taiwan's Status?

    Depending on how Taiwan's status is resolved, U.S.-China relations could range from friendly cooperation to cold war. As China's military capabilities grow, it will be increasingly important for the US. to both prevent an attempt at violent reunification and maintain the capability to defeat it.

    May 12, 2007