Rick Eden

Photo of Rick Eden
Associate Director, RAND Office of Research Quality Assurance; Adjunct Member, Human Subjects Protection Committee; Senior International/Defense Researcher
Santa Monica Office

Education

Ph.D. and M.A. in English Language and Literature, University of California, Los Angeles; B.A. in English and linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Rick Eden is a senior international/defense researcher at the RAND Corporation, where he has conducted and published research in a wide range of policy areas. He also serves as RAND's associate director of Research Quality Assurance and is an adjunct member of RAND's Institutional Review Board for human subjects research. Before joining RAND, Eden served on the faculty of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque; he has also taught at the University of California, Los Angeles; the University of Southern California; and California State University, Los Angeles. He received his Ph.D. in English from UCLA. 

Recent Projects

  • Research to support improvement of U.S. military logistics processes

Selected Publications

Rick Eden, "Faster, Better, Cheaper: U.S. Army Manages a Logistics Revolution," RAND Review, 26(1), 2002

Tora K. Bikson et al., eds., Ethical Principles in Social-Behavioral Research on Terrorism: Probing the Parameters, RAND Corporation (WR-490-4-NSF/DOJ), 2007

Eric Peltz et al., Sustainment of Army Forces in Operation Iraqi Freedom: Major Findings and Recommendations, RAND Corporation (MG-342-A), 2005

Rick Eden and Patricia Boren, Timely Assistance: Evaluating the Speed of Road Home Grantmaking, RAND Corporation (DB-557-LRA), 2002

John Dumond, Rick Eden, Improving Government Processes: From Velocity Management to Presidential Appointments, RAND Corporation (RP-1153), 2005

Commentary

  • Lean Thinking Comes to the Battlefield

    The 1991 Gulf War represented the pinnacle of the U.S. industrial approach to warfare: overwhelming mass. Subsequently, the U.S. military began the shift to a new support paradigm, adapting the lean, best practices of contemporary business, write Eric Peltz and Rick Eden.

    Jun 5, 2008 Forbes

Publications