Sarah Soliman

Photo of Sarah Soliman
Technical Analyst
Washington Office

Education

M.Phil. in technology policy, University of Cambridge; B.S. in computer engineering, West Virginia University; B.S. in biometric systems, West Virginia University

Overview

Sarah Soliman is a technical analyst at the RAND Corporation. Her research interests lie at the intersection of national security, emerging technology, and identity.

As part of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, Soliman traveled all over Iraq and Afghanistan for two years as a field engineer supporting ISR, biometrics, forensics, and sensitive site exploitation, including time with Special Operations Command.

Soliman was part of the 2018 Department of Homeland Security Analytic Exchange Program, served as a technical mentor to the Hacking for Defense class at Georgetown University in spring 2017, and was a Fall 2009 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow to the National Academy of Sciences. Other previous D.C. affiliations include time at the White House Office of Strategic Initiatives and the Department of Defense Biometrics Management Office.

She earned her M.Phil. in technology policy from the University of Cambridge and her B.S. in biometric systems and computer engineering from the West Virginia University Statler College of Engineering.

Recent Projects

  • Testing Standards for Cyber Range Infrastructure
  • Accelerating Modernization and Innovation: Use of OTAs for Prototype Projects
  • Assessing the Risk-Mitigation Value of Biometrics at Maritime Facilities
  • Building and Retaining a Military Cyber Force
  • Measuring Barriers to Mental Health Care and Stigma in the Military

Selected Publications

COL Glenn Voelz, USA, and Sarah Soliman, "Identity, Attribution, and the Challenge of Targeting in the Cyberdomain," Marine Corps University Journal, 7(1), 2016

Sarah Soliman, Options for Next Generation Blue Force Biometrics, Divergent Opinions, 2017

Honors & Awards

  • Spotlight Award, RAND Corporation
  • Innovation Award, RAND Corporation

Commentary

  • Syrian refugees stand in line as they wait for aid packages at Al Zaatari refugee camp in Mafraq, Jordan, January 20, 2016

    Tracking Refugees with Biometrics: More Questions Than Answers

    Using biometrics in refugee crises is compelling because it gives individuals who have nothing proof of identity even without a government-issued credential like an ID card or passport. But who has rights to the U.N. biometrics database and what is its future?

    Mar 9, 2016 War on the Rocks

Publications