Clare Stevens

Photo of Clare Stevens
Policy Analyst
Off Site Office

Education

M.P.H., University of Texas

Overview

Clare Stevens is a policy analyst at the RAND Corporation. Stevens' research focuses on increasing access to high quality care in underserved communities and reducing health disparities. Her experience includes research and management of a range of projects related to improving access to mental health care for vulnerable populations, improving housing and health services for people living with HIV, maternal and child health, veteran and caregiver health, and Medicaid expansion. Stevens has experience in qualitative methodology including: developing data collection instruments and protocols, conducting semi-structured field and phone interviews, facilitating focus groups, coding, analyzing, and synthesizing data. Stevens also has expertise in technical assistance provision, writing and disseminating research findings, managing field operations, and leading project management tasks to ensure the quality and timeliness of program deliverables. Stevens holds an M.P.H. degree from the University of Texas School of Public Health.

Recent Projects

  • Evaluation of the NYC Connections to Care Initiative
  • Addressing HIV Care and Housing Coordination Through Data Integration to Improve Health Outcomes Along the HIV Care Continuum
  • Child Trauma Response Team Evaluation
  • Evaluation of the Marine Intercept Suicide Prevention Program
  • Improving Perinatal Outcomes Using Conditional Cash Transfers

Languages

Spanish

Commentary

  • Man talks with mental health practitioner via telemedecine, photo by verbaska_studio/Getty Images

    Want to Stem the Rising Mental Health Crisis? Look Beyond the Usual Suspects for Help

    As the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effects spread, concerns about mental health impacts continue to grow. Many communities and policymakers are desperate to stem the tide of unaddressed mental health needs, and with the right investments in training, task-shifting models have enormous potential to bolster available, accessible mental health services.

    May 12, 2020 Psych Central

Publications