Senior Airman Ken McDougall shows Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein the results of code Goldfein wrote during a visit to Project Kessel Run in Boston, Massachusetts, December 6, 2018, photo by Jerry Saslav/U.S. Air Force

commentary

(War on the Rocks)

How to Actually Recruit Talent for the AI Challenge

Senior Airman Ken McDougall shows Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein the results of code Goldfein wrote in Boston, Massachusetts, December 6, 2018

Photo by Jerry Saslav/U.S. Air Force

by James Ryseff

February 5, 2020

This article was submitted in response to a call for ideas issued by the co-chairs of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, Robert Work and Eric Schmidt. You can find all of RAND's submissions here.

In the global race to dominate artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, talent is everything. Yet the U.S. government has proven unwilling or unable to do what it takes to hire and hold America's top talent.

Russia and China have long mixed their public and private sector resources when it comes to cyber technologies. Russian organized criminal groups often lend their best hackers to work part-time for the Russian state, while the People's Liberation Army's concept of a “modern people's war” designates experts from major Chinese technology companies and academia as assets for improving national military power.…

The remainder of this commentary is available at warontherocks.com.


James Ryseff is a technical analyst with the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation. He previously worked as a software engineer for 13 years at Microsoft, SAP, and Google, among others. He holds a bachelors' degree in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a masters' in security studies from Georgetown University.

This commentary originally appeared on War on the Rocks on February 5, 2020. Commentary gives RAND researchers a platform to convey insights based on their professional expertise and often on their peer-reviewed research and analysis.