Education Issues

This page offers an easy way for policymakers to access education research and analysis that is relevant to current Congressional agendas. For additional information, to request documents, or to arrange a briefing, contact the RAND Office of Congressional Relations at ocr@rand.org or (703) 413-1100 x5643.

Recent Findings

  • President Joe Biden addresses a joint session of Congress, with Vice President Kamala Harris and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi behind him, Washington, D.C., April 28, 2021, photo by Melina Mara/Reuters

    Blog

    Biden's First Address to Congress: Insights from RAND

    Apr 29, 2021

    President Joe Biden addressed a joint session of Congress, summarizing his administration's early COVID-19 response and outlining plans that aim to loosen the pandemic's year-long grip on a weary nation. The speech reflected the fact that the United States faces policy challenges across a wide range of domains.

  • Teacher helping pupil using computer In classroom, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Commentary

    The Importance of Gathering Evidence of Edtech Impact

    Apr 27, 2021

    Given the increased reliance on technology to support learning, now may be a good time for educational technology companies to start thinking more seriously about the data they collect and how they use it.

  • Blog

    Summer Learning, America's Middle Class, Waking Up After the Pandemic: RAND Weekly Recap

    Apr 23, 2021

    This weekly recap focuses on how to make summer learning count, U.S. deterrence in the ‘gray zone,’ why so many Americans are stuck outside the middle class, and more.

  • Elementary schoolchildren wearing face masks in a classroom, photo by kevajefimija/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Commit Now to Get Summer Programming Right

    Apr 15, 2021

    When summer programs are targeted to needs, intentionally designed, and well attended, they produce positive outcomes in math and reading. But these programs need federal support, and they require early planning.

  • Blog

    Trust in the CDC, Teaching Students with Disabilities, Russian Mercenaries: RAND Weekly Recap

    Apr 9, 2021

    This weekly recap focuses declining trust in the CDC, insights from educators about teaching students with disabilities, Russian mercenaries, and more.

  • Nurse practitioner Lisa Flemmons and chief nursing officer Robin L. Steaban give a thumbs up after Flemmons received a COVID-19 vaccine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, December 17, 2020, photo by George Walker IV/USA Today via Reuters

    Commentary

    Who Can Effectively Champion the Vax?

    Apr 9, 2021

    Vaccine hesitancy appears to be one more hurdle in ending the COVID-19 pandemic. The CDC would typically lead a campaign to overcome it, but Americans' trust in the CDC has declined measurably. Health care professionals may be more effective messengers when it comes to COVID-19 vaccines.

  • A teacher and student wearing face masks talk to each other using sign language, photo by Wavebreakmedia/Getty Images

    Report

    How Are Teachers Educating Students with Disabilities During the Pandemic?

    Apr 8, 2021

    Remote and hybrid learning can present particular challenges to students with disabilities (SWD) and their teachers. Nearly two in five teachers said that their schools offered alternative arrangements for SWD during the pandemic. But this was less common in schools serving more students of color and more students experiencing poverty.

More Research on Education

Briefings

  • The Effects of NYC's 5th-Grade Promotion Policy

    Oct 19, 2009

    Policy analyst Jennifer McCombs and statistician Lou Mariano will discuss the findings of their evaluation of the New York City Department of Education's 5th-grade promotion policy.

  • What Does Economics Tell Us About Early Childhood Policy?

    May 12, 2008

    Studies show how insights from the field of economics—human capital theory and monetary payoffs—contribute to the science of early childhood policy. Panelists will discuss the implications of the findings from their research for early childhood policy.

  • Panel Discussion on No Child Left Behind

    Jan 9, 2008

    RAND will host a panel discussion on No Child Left Behind (NCLB): What Do We Know, and What Does It Tell Us? on January 9. Panelists include John Deasy, Michelle Rhee, Laura Hamilton, Brian Stecher, and Georges Vernez.

More Education Briefings

Alerts & Newsletters

RAND periodically sends alerts and newsletters to update Congress on highlights of recent work about education.

  • Security camera in a classroom

    School Safety in the U.S.

    Jun 27, 2018

    In the wake of several school shootings, policymakers have been weighing proposals aimed at improving school safety. Many of these promote technologies such as metal detectors and video cameras. How effective are these devices?

  • Students and tourists rest in lawn chairs in Harvard Yard

    Spotlight on Higher Education

    Mar 26, 2018

    Colleges and universities have an opportunity to improve their response to sexual assaults, emerging evidence from Texas community colleges on the effectiveness of corequisite models, and more in a roundup of RAND's work in higher education.

  • A female systems engineer working on a computer server

    STEM Workforce Disparities

    Jan 18, 2018

    Women and racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to earn STEM degrees and enter STEM employment. Minorities also experience attainment and wage gaps in these jobs. Without stronger support for these groups, the STEM economy may fail to optimize the pool of potential workers needed to sustain growth and innovation.

  • yellow school bus

    The Economic Benefits of Later School Start Times

    Dec 6, 2017

    In the first-ever state-by-state analysis of the economic implications of a shift in school start times, researchers found that within a decade, a nationwide move to 8:30 a.m. could contribute $83 billion to the U.S. economy.

  • College campus tour guide talking with prospective students

    National Database Could Help Students Pick a College—and Income

    Aug 16, 2017

    Developing a searchable, secure national database could help students link their college decision to potential earnings later on—leading to more informed choices about higher education.

  • Preschool-age children laugh while their teacher reads them a book during story time

    In Case You Missed It: Informing Investments in High-Quality Preschool

    Jun 6, 2017

    Are high-quality preschool programs worth the investment they take to succeed? Lynn Karoly presents a congressional briefing presenting evidence of the short- and long-term effects of high-quality preschool programs.

  • A teacher helps a student

    Considering Education Policy in the 115th Congress

    Mar 16, 2017

    What are the biggest education issues facing the 115th Congress? RAND experts offer up insight on a variety of topics, including early childhood care and learning and K-12 issues, career and technical education, higher education, and workforce development.

  • U.S. President-elect Donald Trump (center) and Vice President-elect Mike Pence (left) emerge with Betsy DeVos after a meeting at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, November 19, 2016

    Making American Education Great Will Require More than Charter Schools

    Dec 19, 2016

    Charter schools could become an important part of a great education system, says RAND's Darleen Opfer. But this burst of attention poses a risk that other issues will be ignored.

  • Rows of empty desks in a school

    Inside the Opt-Out Movement

    May 23, 2016

    For several years, parents across the country have resisted standardized tests by opting out for their kids. This decision, however, may have social consequences that reach far beyond the quality of an individual child's school-based experiences.

  • Student taking a standardized test

    Test Smarter: Recommendations for Improving Standardized Testing

    Nov 17, 2015

    The Department of Education's recently released Testing Action Plan recommends that statewide testing be limited to no more than two percent of instructional time, but the amount of testing isn't the only consideration: Policymakers should also examine the usefulness and purpose of testing.


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Testimony

2006 and prior

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