From the RAND Blog

See below for the latest commentary from the RAND Education and Labor team. For a complete list of related blog content, see education posts and workforce posts on the RAND Blog.

  • COVID-19's Effects on U.S. Schools, Vaccine Uptake, Small Businesses: RAND Weekly Recap

    May 29, 2020

    This weekly recap focuses on how COVID-19 has affected U.S. schools, potential barriers to vaccine uptake, what small businesses need to survive, and more.

  • Manager Flory Ramirez waits for customers as restaurants are reopened following the lifting of some restrictions in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Houston, Texas, May 1, 2020, photo by Go Nakamura/Reuters

    To Preserve Jobs, America's Employers May Have to Get Creative

    May 26, 2020

    With about 38.6 million Americans filing for unemployment insurance benefits since the end of February, it is clear that COVID-19 has turned the world of work upside down. One way to reduce the economic damage may be job-sharing, an approach that focuses on maximizing jobs by reducing workers' hours rather than resorting to layoffs or furloughs.

  • A man carries food donated by Alianza Ecuatoriana International at a food pantry in Queens, New York, May 16, 2020, photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

    Emergency COVID-19 Aid Helps College Students with Food and Housing: Four Ways Colleges Can Maintain That Support

    May 26, 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic has expanded the pool of cash-strapped college students, but many were already struggling. The crisis could draw attention to food and housing insecurity among college students, and give college leaders a chance to consider how to address these needs more systematically over the long-term.

  • Middle school reading teacher Shayna Boyd prepares for the start of remote teaching in her home office in Chicago, Illinois, April 8, 2020, photo by Brendan O'Brien/Reuters

    How COVID-19 Affected America's Schools

    May 26, 2020

    RAND surveyed teachers and principals to gauge how the pandemic has affected schooling, what supports these educators need, and how they are thinking about the next school year.

  • Polygonal image of COVID-19 virus superimposed on a digital world map, photo by Andrii Pokliatskyi/Getty Images

    Global Challenges to Maintaining a Healthy Workforce During a Pandemic: Views from RAND Experts

    May 15, 2020

    As nations across the globe remain in lockdown to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, questions about the future of employment and workforce productivity emerge. During a recent webinar, RAND experts discussed how to get people back to work and improve productivity post COVID-19.

  • A man holding male and female figures on a seesaw with a roll of 200 Euro bills in the middle, photo by Andrii Yalanskyi/Getty Images

    Equal Pay for Equal Work: How Binding Pay Transparency Measures May Help

    May 12, 2020

    More than 60 years ago, the EU introduced the principle of equal pay for equal work for men and women. But a gender pay gap persists in most countries. In 2014, a European Commission Recommendation encouraged measures to aid pay transparency, but implementation has been limited.

  • Women work on a production line at a mobile phone factory in Assuit, Egypt, September 30, 2018, photo by Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

    Economic Recovery in Egypt Should Include Women

    May 11, 2020

    Despite tremendous strides in educational attainment, women's engagement in the labor force in Egypt remains limited. Will Egypt's post-pandemic recovery further exacerbate structural barriers and inequities? Or could the current economic crisis be an opportunity to develop new opportunities to employ women and foster conditions for a more inclusive and diversified labor force?

  • A man speaks with a library worker after receiving an unemployment form in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020, photo by Marco Bello/Reuters

    Prof Asks, Is the Unemployment Rate Now Higher Than It Was in the Great Depression?

    May 7, 2020

    The extent of COVID-19's effect on the labor market will be catastrophic for many workers and businesses, writes Prof. Kathryn Edwards. Matching the unemployment rate peak set by the Great Depression is a possibility, but reaching this unfortunate milestone is not necessary to establish the historic nature of the downturn we are living through today.

  • Boston Public School teacher Princess Bryant teaches her kindergarten class via videoconference from her apartment in Boston, Massachusetts, April 28, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Now That Digital Materials Are Front and Center, How Should They Be Used?

    May 4, 2020

    Schools and teachers can support student learning during the COVID-19 crisis by considering how to keep curricula front and center alongside a set of targeted digital materials that connect with curricula and can keep students learning, engaged, and connected to their school support systems.

  • Joseph Wilkinson does schoolwork at his home in Manchester, Britain, March 23, 2020, photo by Phil Noble/Reuters

    Digital Learning Needs to Benefit All Children When Schools Close

    May 4, 2020

    Three factors are essential for any digital learning method. First, it must be inclusive. Second, it should support the learning experience, not replace it. And third, evidence of what works should inform digital learning interventions.

  • Housekeeper washing the dishes wearing a mask, photo by FG Trade/Getty Images

    Protecting Household Employers and Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Apr 23, 2020

    As the federal government extends aid to people put out of work by the COVID-19 pandemic, it could do more to help one group of employers and the vital American workers they employ: hundreds of thousands of nannies, housekeepers, and others employed in private homes.

  • Police officers from the Madison Police Department wearing face protective gear take information from a man at a bus stop in Madison, Wisconsin, April 17, 2020, photo by Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

    Reactivating Retirees for Police Service in Times of Crisis

    Apr 21, 2020

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, an increasing number of police officers and deputies have been exposed to or tested positive for the coronavirus. Gaps in personnel coverage could be filled by easing restrictions on the hiring of retired police officers rather than relying on existing resources.

  • Back view of large group of students paying attention on a class at lecture hall, photo by skynesher/Getty Images

    Is It Time to Rethink the Separation Between the High School and Postsecondary Systems?

    Apr 16, 2020

    We do not yet know how long or deep this economic downturn will be, or how the pandemic will affect the way we work and learn. But just as the post-coronavirus workplace is surely being re-envisioned, this crisis should motivate us to reconsider the structure of our educational system. Early college is a model that can help inform these discussions.

  • Naomi Hassebroek holds her son Felix while working with her husband Doug Hassebroek at their home, during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brooklyn, New York, March 19, 2020, photo by Caitlin Ochs/Reuters

    Can We Emerge from COVID-19 with a Healthier Work Culture?

    Apr 16, 2020

    American families want greater choices in determining how their work and their families fit together. Post-pandemic, can we create a system that fits workers? If so, we have the opportunity to emerge from this crisis with both healthier employees and better performing organizations.

  • Hallways are empty during school closures in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus, in Milton-Union Exempted Village School District in West Milton, Ohio, March 13, 2020, photo by Kyle Grillot/Reuters

    Coronavirus Will Necessitate Changes in Schools When They Reopen

    Apr 16, 2020

    Schools will likely need to modify their practices so that their teachers, staff, and students maintain social distancing standards whenever they reopen. If a federal agency would create guidance, then educators could focus on teaching students.