Featured Research

  • U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev sign the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty at Prague Castle in the Czech Republic, April 8, 2010, photo by Jason Reed/Reuters

    The Military Case for Extending New START

    Feb 14, 2020

    The most prudent course of action would be for Washington to extend the U.S.-Russia New START agreement before it expires in February 2021. This would constrain Russia's nuclear forces covered by the treaty for five more years. And it would buy time to pursue multilateral negotiations that also include China.

  • Educator listens during a parent-teacher conference, photo by SDI Productions/Getty Images

    Principals Could Use More Support to Help Students with Disabilities

    Feb 13, 2020

    Principals play a critical role in supporting America's 6.7 million students with disabilities. But most principals—especially those who lead schools that serve mostly students of color—believe that their schools could do a better job in this area.

  • Americans, providing the main muscle for a global peace force, cross a pontoon bridge toward the northern Bosnian town of Orasje, December 31, 1995, photo by Petar Kudjundzic/Reuters

    Seizing the 'Golden Hour' of Stability Operations

    Feb 11, 2020

    The early phases of stability operations are critical for improving the odds of success and reducing the costs of achieving an acceptable outcome. Both diplomatic and military actions to provide security in the postconflict country are essential and should be integrated. Past U.S. interventions offer valuable lessons.

  • A saluting soldier and a civilian man in an airport, images by ViewApart and MariaArefyeva/Getty Images; design by Rick Penn-Kraus/RAND Corporation

    Do Civilians Receive the Support They Need After Deployment?

    Feb 11, 2020

    As more U.S. government civilians have been deployed over the past two decades, increasing numbers have been exposed to high-threat environments. Combat exposure and related stressors correlate with significant levels of health conditions. How are these civilians reintegrated when they return?

  • Hospital staff wear protective gear to protect them from an Ebola virus infection in the emergency department of Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, New York, October 8, 2014, photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

    The U.S. System of Care for Infectious Diseases Could Be Improved

    Feb 7, 2020

    The current system of care for rare but serious infectious diseases in the United States could be strengthened or more formalized in several ways. But how could these efforts be financed, both in terms of initial investments and long-term sustainability?

  • Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa addresses the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters in New York City, New York, September 25, 2019, photo by Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

    Has Zimbabwe Changed Since Mugabe's Overthrow?

    Feb 6, 2020

    After 37 years in power, President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe was toppled via a military coup in November 2017. His successor and former vice president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, promised a break from authoritarian rule and economic mismanagement. Has he delivered?

  • An M1075 palletized load system truck and an M915 line-haul tractor are equipped with add-on kits that transform the vehicles to be fully autonomous, photo by Bruce Huffman/U.S. Army

    How the Army Could Use Automated Driving Technology

    Feb 5, 2020

    Fully automated convoys are not yet feasible, but U.S. Army R&D communities have been testing automated truck concepts in which manned and unmanned vehicles perform cooperatively in convoy operations. What are potential benefits and risks in deploying this technology over the next five years?

  • Chinese Premier Li Keqiang wears a mask and protective suit while speaking to medical workers at the Jinyintan hospital, where coronavirus patients are being treated following the outbreak in Wuhan, China, January 27, 2020, photo by cnsphoto via Reuters

    From SARS to the Coronavirus: U.S.-China Collaborations on Pandemic Response

    Feb 5, 2020

    China's unfolding battle against the coronavirus highlights the importance of transparency and open collaboration among scientists globally. What are some ways the United States can help China manage the pandemic now? And how can future U.S.–China collaborations on global health be improved?

  • The West Coast Aerospace Forum provides a rare chance to engage with some of the Air Force's most senior and experienced leaders as well as top civilian national security experts in a setting that encourages debate, discussion, and audience interaction.

    An Air and Space Force Designed for the Future

    Feb 4, 2020

    At the fifth annual West Coast Aerospace Forum, some of the Air Force's most senior leaders joined RAND researchers and other top national security experts to discuss important issues related to the future of air and space power.

  • U.S. Army M1 Abrams tanks perform a strategic convoy maneuver at the Hohenfels Training Area, Germany, May 2, 2018, photo by Spc. Andrew McNeil/U.S. Army

    Understanding the Deterrent Impact of U.S. Overseas Forces

    Feb 4, 2020

    After Russian aggression in Ukraine, and with rising U.S.-China tensions, the question of whether U.S. overseas military presence can enhance deterrence remains central. What does the evidence suggest?

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin at his annual end-of-year news conference in Moscow, Russia, December 19, 2019, photo by Evgenia Novozhenina/Reuters

    What Provokes Putin's Russia?

    Jan 29, 2020

    Even with an understanding of what Russia considers to be redlines, predicting its reactions is challenging. An analysis of past instances of Russian escalation—and instances when redlines were crossed but Russia did not respond—offers guidance for U.S. and NATO deterrence efforts.

  • Building with large H sign for hospital, photo by peterspiro/Getty Images

    California's Hospital Seismic Safety Requirements: Cost and Affordability

    Jan 28, 2020

    By 2030, California hospitals will be required by law to remain operational after a major earthquake. How much might it cost to reach compliance by the deadline? And can hospitals afford this estimated spending?

  • A woman signs a condolence book for Iranian Major-General Qassem Soleimani at the Iranian embassy in Minsk, Belarus, January 10, 2020, photo by Vasily Fedosenko/Reuters

    Escalation with Iran: Outcomes and Implications for the United States

    Jan 28, 2020

    In the aftermath of the killing of Iranian Major-General Qassem Soleimani, the United States should be prepared for a further response from Iran. What are some courses of action the regime might take? And what are options for the United States moving forward?

  • British and European Union flags in a cloudy sky, photo by themotioncloud/Getty Images

    Further Trade Uncertainty Due to Brexit Could Cost UK Billions

    Jan 28, 2020

    The UK's official departure from the EU only ends the first phase of trade uncertainty related to Brexit. Costs to the UK economy are likely to continue during the UK–EU renegotiation period and will increase over time. By the end of 2020, UK GDP could decrease by $5.5 billion (£4.4bn).

  • A student working at her desk in a classroom, photo by Rachael Hacking/Show the Good

    The Promise of Community Schools

    Jan 28, 2020

    The New York City Community Schools Initiative is based on a holistic strategy of education reform. Academics, health and wellness, youth development, and family engagement are integrated into each school. This approach had positive effects on most of the examined student outcomes.

  • Artificial intelligence concept of eye with overlay of military helicopter and submarine, images by 4X-image/Getty Images; design by Jessica Arana/RAND Corporation

    Thinking Machines Will Change Future Warfare

    Jan 27, 2020

    Until now, deterrence has been about humans trying to dissuade other humans from doing something. But what if the thinking is done by AI and autonomous systems? A wargame explored what happens to deterrence when decisions can be made at machine speeds and when states can put fewer human lives at risk.

  • Visualization of network graph, image by Jonathan William Welburn/RAND Corporation

    Systemic Risk in the Broad Economy

    Jan 21, 2020

    After the 2008 financial crisis, research and policy focused on the risk that heavily interconnected networks could fuel the spread of economic crises—a problem known as systemic risk. A new analysis considers systemic risk in other sectors like technology, telecommunications, and health care.

  • Airport trading cards, photos by Airports Council International-North America; design by Katherine Wu/RAND Corporation

    U.S. Airport Infrastructure Funding and Financing

    Jan 14, 2020

    Passenger air travel is at an all-time high, and demand for it is expected to rise. Will current levels of spending under existing federal policies be sufficient to enable commercial airports to make the infrastructure investments needed to meet that demand?

  • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan speaks during a ceremony marking the second anniversary of the attempted coup at the presidential palace in Ankara, July 15, 2018, photo by Umit Bektas/Reuters

    Turkey's Nationalist Course and How It Affects U.S.-Turkish Relations

    Jan 14, 2020

    America's longstanding partnership with Turkey, a powerful NATO ally, has become strained in recent years. The two countries' interests are not as aligned as they once were, and tensions between Turkey and Europe have exacerbated these strains. What can be done to sustain the U.S.-Turkish relationship?

  • A woman taking a call in prison, photo by Thinkstock Images/Getty Images

    Many Detainees with Mental Illness Could Be Safely Diverted to Community Care

    Jan 7, 2020

    In June 2019, more than 5,500 people in Los Angeles County jails were in mental health housing units and/or were taking psychotropic medications. Based on legal and clinical factors, 61 percent of these individuals were likely eligible for release into community-based treatment.