Welcome to the RAND Gulf States Policy Institute

About the RAND Gulf States Policy Institute

RAND created the Gulf States Policy Institute in 2005 to support hurricane recovery and long-term economic development in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Today, RAND Gulf States provides objective analysis to federal, state, and local leaders in support of evidence-based policymaking and the well-being of individuals throughout the Gulf States region. With an office in New Orleans, Louisiana, RAND Gulf States is dedicated to answering the region's toughest questions related to a wide range of issues that include coastal protection and restoration, health care, and workforce development.

Examining Our Impact

Gulf States map

Established in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina, the RAND Gulf States Policy Institute tackles tough questions in the topic areas relevant to the region's long-term economic development and the well-being of its residents. For example: How to protect the coasts from future storms? How to provide housing and health care for a population in need? How to educate tomorrow's workforce? And how to ensure energy and transportation for a growing economy?

  • Increasing Community Resilience in the Gulf States Region

    Community resilience requires participation from the whole community to improve response and recovery, and to plan for disaster recovery over the long term. This is a lesson that the U.S. Gulf States have learned in the last decade, and their experiences are helping teach other communities across the nation how to become more resilient.

Recent News and Reports

  • Reducing Coastal Flood Risk with a Lake Pontchartrain Barrier

    Aug 4, 2017

    A Lake Pontchartrain barrier could provide substantial damage reduction benefits—including reduced flood depths and preventing direct economic damage—for southeastern Louisiana, potentially amounting to billions of dollars saved per year.

  • The Cost of Coastal Land Loss in Louisiana

    Jul 19, 2017

    If it goes unchecked, coastal land loss in Louisiana will continue, resulting in damaged or destroyed capital stock (i.e., buildings and network infrastructure). A RAND analysis estimates replacing capital stock directly at risk from land loss will cost $2.1 billion to $3.5 billion.

  • Economic Evaluation of Coastal Land Loss in Louisiana

    Jul 19, 2017

    Louisiana has lost approximately 1,880 square miles of land over the past 80 years. Projections suggest that in a future without action, the next 50 years could result in the loss of 1,750 additional square miles of land area.

  • Is Suicide Preventable? Insights from Research

    May 8, 2017

    Conventional wisdom about suicide prevention suggests that one just needs to know what warning signs to look for. But that's not the case.

View News and Reports Archive