Mental Health

Health care reform efforts in the United States seek to ensure appropriate access to mental health care, to deliver it efficiently and effectively, and to allocate scarce resources wisely. RAND Health Care studies the effect of these reforms, different programs for preventing and treating mental illnesses, and the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based practices.

  • A mental health professional takes notes while talking with a soldier, photo by asiseeit/Getty Images

    Quality Matters in Mental Health Care for Veterans

    High-quality mental health care is treatment that has been proven effective and is safe, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Veterans who receive such care are much more likely to improve and recover. Ensuring that they get the care they need also helps their families.

  • A licensed clinical social worker listens to her client during a therapy session at the Bay Pines Veterans Administration Healthcare Center in Bay Pines, Florida, October 29, 2015, photo by EJ Hersom/DoD News

    How to Improve Mental Health Care for Veterans

    Veterans, especially those who deployed overseas, face elevated risks of mental health conditions. Those who have served since 9/11 are particularly vulnerable. About one in five experiences mental health problems. Are veterans getting the high-quality care that they need?

  • A guest looks at the Temple of Time, a structure built to serve as a healing place for those affected by the shooting which claimed 17 lives at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Coral Springs, Florida, February 14, 2019, photo by Joe Skipper/Reuters

    After School Shootings, Children and Communities Struggle to Heal

    School shootings leave wounds that affect students, school staff, families, and communities for years. Building community resilience, implementing evidence-based mental health support early, and providing access for survivors and the community immediately and in the long term could help promote healing and prevent more tragedy.

  • Doctor speaking on the phone, photo by sturti/Getty Images

    Child Psychiatry Telephone Consultation Programs Help Increase Mental Health Services for Children

    Telephone hotlines that allow primary care doctors to immediately consult with a child psychiatrist about urgent patient problems appear to increase the number of children who receive aid, offering one strategy to help more children receive mental health services.

Browse All RAND Research on Mental Health and Illness