Working Group Members

The RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy (CAPP) Gender Equity Initiative aims to study various facets of gender equity in South Korea, Pakistan, and other Asian countries. The initiative features a working group of non-RAND experts from diverse backgrounds to bring new perspectives and capacity into the conversations and workshops.

Jisoo Hwang

Jisoo Hwang

Dr. Jisoo Hwang is an associate professor at the College of Liberal Studies at Seoul National University. Her research focuses on labor economics, family economics, and public economics.

Before joining Seoul National University, Hwang was an associate professor at the Hankuk University of Foreign Studies and worked as an economist at the Economic Research Institute in Bank of Korea. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University and a B.A. in economics from Seoul National University.

Jennifer Jung-Kim

Jennifer Jung-Kim

Dr. Jennifer Jung-Kim is a continuing lecturer at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) currently teaching classes ranging from Korean history, politics, popular culture, gender dynamics to East Asia and Asian America. She teaches courses on Korean history in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures. She also teaches Introduction to East Asia in the International and Area Studies program. Jung-Kim was selected for a Distinguished Teaching Award in 2021.

Jung-Kim earned her B.A. in Oriental studies from Barnard College of Columbia University (Barnard), an M.A. in Korean literature and cultural history, and Ph.D. in Korean cultural history from UCLA.

Jiin Jung

Jiin Jung

Dr. Jiin Jung is a social psychologist and postdoctoral research fellow in the department of psychology at New York University. Before coming to New York University, she served as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Kansas. She is a member-at-large of the Board of the Computational Social Science Society of the Americas.

Her research seeks to understand the cognitive and social aspects of belief dynamics that reduce polarization and social division while promoting social change and diversity. She combines social psychology and other disciplines with a complex adaptive systems approach to understand multi-level causal links between micro-level belief mechanisms and macro-level norm dynamics over many iterations. She investigates these dynamics in a wide range of contexts, from large societal settings including Korean reunification, Scottish independence, the Korea-China history dispute, and American partisan polarization to small- and medium-sized groups such as organizational collaborations, jury deliberation, and task teams.

Seung-kyung Kim

Seung-kyung Kim

Dr. Seung-kyung Kim is the inaugural Korea Foundation professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, and director of the Institute for Korean Studies within the School of Global and International Studies. Before coming to Indiana University, Kim served as chair of the Department of Women’s Studies and director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Maryland. She has also served as the founding director of the Asian American Studies Program, and as acting associate dean for the College of Arts and Humanities.

Her scholarship addresses the participation of women in social movements as workers and in relation to the state; the processes of transnational migration in the context of globalization and the experiences of families in that process, especially with regard to education; and feminist theories of social change.

Besides numerous journal articles and book chapters, she is the author of Class Struggle or Family Struggle?: Lives of Women Factory Workers in South Korea (Cambridge University Press, 2009/1997) and The Korean Women's Movement and the State: Bargaining for Change (Routledge, 2014), and co-editor of Feminist Theory Reader: Local and Global Perspectives (Routledge, 2016/2013/2009/2003).

Young-Mi Kim

Young-Mi Kim

Young-Mi Kim is an associate professor of sociology at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Her main research area is gender inequality in the labor market and organizations. Her research now centers on two related topics: one on the organizational (re)production of gender inequality and the other on its social consequence in the form of the lowest-low fertility.

Chaewon Lee

Chaewon Lee

Chaewon Lee is a master’s student in the department of East Asian languages and cultures at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research interests are in gender, work, family, inequalities, social policy, and cultural sociology. Her current research examines how gender norms and ideologies interact with work-family policies to shape the ways in which women negotiate work and family responsibilities in their day-to-day lives.

Lee holds a B.A. in international studies (with a concentration in diplomacy, security, governance) and East Asian languages and cultures also from Indiana University, Bloomington.

Soojin Lee

Soojin Lee

Soojin Lee was a researcher at National Assembly Futures Institute analyzing data to derive mid- to long-term national development strategies to strengthen the policy competency of the National Assembly of Korea. Lee also worked as a visiting scholar at RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy (CAPP).

Her research interests include population aging, lower fertility rate, and economic development. Recent research includes developing policies in Korea to support the fertility rate and promote female workforce participation. Lee received her M.S. in international commerce (international studies) from Korea University.

You Jung Lee

You Jung Lee

You Jung Lee’s main practice areas are constitutional and administrative litigation and family law. Throughout her career, Lee has participated as a committee member in a number of government agencies, including the Public Services Pension Payment Reexamination Board, Public Institution Management Committee, among others. Lee has successfully represented local government bodies, including the city of Seoul, in a number of high-profile cases.

Lee has also been active in her support of NGO activities, as evidenced by her role as advisor to the Korea Sexual Violence Relief Center and Korea Women’s Hotline.

Seungsook Moon

Seungsook Moon

Professor Moon is a political and cultural sociologist, scholar of gender studies, and East Asianist specializing in South Korea. She grew up in Seoul, Korea and lived and worked in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts before moving to Vassar College. Her research evolved from feminist critiques of nationalism, militarism, democratization, and citizenship to globalization and transnationalism shaping militarism and civic agency, production and consumption of food and masculinities. She is a recipient of notable awards, including a Fulbright Scholars Award (2004–05), an inaugural endowed-chair visiting professorship at Harvard University (2014–15), and the Laboratory Program for Korean Studies Research Grant from the Academy of Korean Studies (2018–23). She was an associate editor of the Journal of Asian Studies and has served on the editorial boards of Gender & Society, Contemporary Sociology, Korea Journal, and Asian Women. She wrote and was consulted for articles published in the following news media: El Pais, The Economist, South China Morning Post, CNN Digital, El Periodico, Korea Herald, and Weekendavisen. In order to balance her cerebral and sedentary life, she has become an amateur Argentine tango dancer.

Jiso Yoon

Jiso Yoon

Dr. Jiso Yoon is director of Center for International Development and Cooperation at Korean Women’s Development Institute (KWDI). She received a Ph.D. in political science from the Pennsylvania State University. Prior to joining KWDI, she held academic positions at Ochanomizu University in Japan and the University of Kansas. She has published widely on women’s political representation, gender and political behavior, and policy advocacy in South Korea and Japan. In 2020, she was a member of the research team that evaluated previous versions of South Korea’s 1325 National Action Plan (NAP) and drafted the third 1325 NAP—a research project commissioned by the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in South Korea.

Songyee Yoon

Songyee Yoon

Songyee Yoon is president and chief strategy officer of NCSOFT, a global leading video game developer and publisher based in South Korea. She was instrumental in founding the NCSOFT AI Center and Natural Language Processing Center created to help further the company’s use of AI and machine learning technology.

Yoon is an advisory board member of RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy and a visiting fellow at Center to Advance Racial Equity Policy at RAND, where she continues to explore social impacts of AI, equity, and ethical sides of technology. She is also a chairperson of the NC Cultural Foundation and ESG Steering Committee.

Yoon graduated from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and holds a Ph.D. from MIT in computational neuroscience based on her research at the MIT Media Lab. Yoon taught media and entertainment business strategy as an adjunct professor at Yonsei University. Yoon served as a chairperson of the Asia Business Leaders Council of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and a member of the South Korea’s Presidential Advisory Council for Science and Technology under two presidents. She has been named as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Young Leader by the Boao Forum of China and one of the 50 Women to Watch in Business by The Wall Street Journal.

Soo-Yeon Yoon

Soo-Yeon Yoon

Dr. Soo-Yeon Yoon is an assistant professor in the Sociology Department of Sonoma State University. She is a sociologist and social demographer who studies family, class, and gender inequality and demographic changes in South Korea. Her research focuses on the theoretical importance of work-family balance through achieving gender equality as a determinant of family demography.

Soo-Yeon completed her Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her dissertation demonstrates the mechanisms through which supportive environments for families and gender equality shape women’s marriages and fertility.