Refugees and Migration

The largest refugee crisis since World War II requires decisionmakers to address the immediate life-saving needs of the millions of individuals fleeing Syria, but also broader issues including education and security. RAND experts help answer the difficult questions: How will hundreds of thousands of refugee children receive an education? How can the international community better support host countries that are absorbing the majority of the region’s refugees? How can international and regional NGO's improve their support for refugees in urban areas?

Our Work

  • A Syrian refugee girl stands near luggage of Syrian refugees returning to Syria, in Beirut, Lebanon, December 6, 2018, photo by Jamal Saidi/Reuters

    Commentary

    Syrian Refugees Won't Be Going Home Any Time Soon

    Active fighting in Syria is dwindling. But Syria remains divided in a frozen conflict and empty peace, unstable and unlikely to attract the investment in reconstruction, public institutions, job creation, and local reconciliation efforts needed to motivate Syrians in large numbers to return home.

  • Workers in a textile factory in Turkey

    Commentary

    Syrian Skills: A Missed Opportunity

    Feb 14, 2019

    Nataraj , et al.

    Syrian refugees in Turkey, Jordan, and Lebanon are finding ways to get by. But many refugees are not able to fully use their skills, and that is a lost opportunity both for the Syrians and the host countries.

  • Um Akram, a Syrian refugee, creates soap under Jasmine, a project which hires and trains Syrian refugee women to create handicrafts, in Amman, Jordan, July 11, 2016

    Commentary

    As Refugees, Syrian Women Find Liberation in Working

    Feb 19, 2019

    Constant, et al.

    Syrian refugee women in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan want opportunities to work. But there are multiple barriers and challenges that limit them. Improving the chances of safe and dignified work opportunities for Syrian women in these countries could yield broad positive social benefits for both the refugee and host communities.

  • Fadia Afashe showing her work at an art gallery in Damascus, Syria, April, 2009

    Commentary

    For One Syrian Refugee, the Research Strikes Close to Home

    Dec 22, 2018

    Afashe

    Fadia Afashe came to the United States to study public policy in 2011, with every intention of eventually going home to Syria. But when her fellowship ended a year later, the possibility of returning home had vanished. She became a refugee success story, but a path for others is needed.

  • Italian MP Marietta Tidei talks with students at a school for vulnerable Syrian refugees in Gaziantep, Turkey

    Journal Article

    Challenges to the Integration of Syrian Refugees

    Dec 18, 2018

    Amaral, et al.

    The successful resettlement of Syrian refugees is dependent on political commitment coupled with public support and community engagement. Social and economic policies to address the crisis require a combined effort in planning, implementing, monitoring, and assessing initiatives, and sharing data with stakeholders.

  • Two workers in a factory in Jordan, October 2018

    Report

    Syrian Refugees Can Add Value to Middle Eastern Labor Markets

    Dec 13, 2018

    Kumar , et al.

    Over 5 million Syrian refugees entered Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan due to the civil war. This has placed a severe strain on the host countries' labor markets, public services, and social cohesion. The future prosperity and stability of the region rests on creating mutually beneficial economic opportunities for Syrian refugees and host-country workers.

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