Featured Research Archive

  • Many Americans Follow Nontraditional Paths to Retirement

    Jul 30, 2018

    Most U.S. seniors follow nonstandard retirement pathways, such as first transitioning to working part time, leaving and then reentering the workforce, or working past age 70, and cognitive ability and personality can be a predictor of retirement path.

  • The Big Lift Implementation Study: Final Report

    Jun 25, 2018

    The Big Lift is a preschool to third grade collective impact initiative in San Mateo County, California, aimed at improving third grade reading achievement. In the implementation phase, to what extent are community members engaging in collective impact, and how are strategies for the four pillars being implemented?

  • Bridge to Opportunities: Connecting Probationers to High-Wage Jobs

    May 25, 2018

    Probation agencies face significant challenges to helping their clients find jobs, and earn living wages. One program focused on the construction industry aimed to improve the earning potential of individuals on probation in Sacramento County, California.

  • Comparing Physical Activity Across the USA, England and the Netherlands

    May 2, 2018

    Survey participants in the Netherlands, England, and the U.S. showed only minor differences in self-reported levels of physical activity, but data from fitness trackers showed Dutch and English participants were much more active than Americans. Activity also declined sharply with age.

  • How Does Medical Care Spending for Injured Workers Affect Post-Injury Earnings?

    May 2, 2018

    The 2003–2004 California workers' compensation reforms reduced medical care spending for injured workers, particularly those suffering low back injuries. Those workers experienced a larger drop in post-injury earnings relative to other injured workers.

  • Dementia Prevalence in the United States in 2010 and 2012

    Apr 27, 2018

    Evidence from a large nationally representative dataset shows the prevalence of dementia declined from 2010 to 2012 among the population aged 65 and older in the United States.

  • RAND American Truck Driver Panel

    Apr 19, 2018

    The RAND American Truck Driver Panel will help answer many questions about technology, changes in the transportation industry and the impact of those changes on truck drivers.

  • Jobs and Criminal Records

    Mar 16, 2018

    The high number of Americans with criminal records has far-reaching economic consequences, in large part because ex-offenders face significant barriers to being hired. RAND researchers are studying ways of addressing employment and income needs for people with criminal records.

  • Why Unretirement Is Working for Older Americans

    Mar 6, 2018

    Significant numbers of older Americans move in and out of the workforce. One in five workers today is 55 or older. By 2024, that number will be one in four. Older workers report having more meaningful work and more workplace flexibility than their younger peers.

  • What Policies Are Most Effective at Incentivizing Employers to Hire Ex-Offenders?

    Feb 14, 2018

    Ex-offenders are less likely to be hired than members of other disadvantaged groups, and former felons with poor economic outcomes are more likely to return to criminal activity. A survey of 100 employers examined how they responded to incentives to hire people with felony criminal records.

  • How to Incentivize Employers to Hire Ex-Offenders

    Jan 15, 2018

    People with criminal records are marginalized in the labor market. What policies might incentivize employers to hire them? Some options include tax credits and replacement guarantees if an ex-offender proves to be unsuitable once hired.

  • How Jakarta's Traffic Affects Labor Market Outcomes for Women and People with Disabilities

    Dec 28, 2017

    Urban transport costs is a potential barrier to female labor force participation in Indonesia. Jakarta has some of the world's worst traffic, and large urban transport or commuting costs increase the time it takes for women to perform daily activities that take place outside the home.

  • The Uphill Climb: Disparities in STEM Occupations

    Dec 8, 2017

    Women and some minorities face disparities in finding and working in occupations in the burgeoning and well-paying areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — fields collectively known as STEM — even with post-secondary education.

  • Postsecondary Education and STEM Employment in the United States

    Dec 6, 2017

    Analysis of three national data sources shows receipt of a bachelor's degree in a STEM field, and attaining certification in any field, is important for success in the STEM labor market. But women and racial or ethnic minorities are less likely to earn these critical degrees and to enter STEM employment.

  • Fighting Poverty with Taxes

    Nov 22, 2017

    As the debate over tax reform continues, finding ways to help the most disadvantaged segment of the population should be considered. Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit and outreach to low-income populations could increase incentive to file or promote awareness about benefits and generate positive impacts in the longer term.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Benefit Children and Provide Economic Returns

    Nov 16, 2017

    A review of early childhood programs, such as home visiting, parent education, and early care and education (ECE), confirms that many programs can improve a range of outcomes for children, and those with cost-benefit analysis show a typical return of $2 to $4 for every dollar invested.

  • Early Childhood Programs Can Improve Outcomes and Outweigh Costs

    Nov 16, 2017

    A review of 115 early childhood interventions — including preschool, home visiting, parent education, and other approaches — finds that most programs have favorable effects on at least one child outcome. And most of the programs with benefit–cost analyses show positive returns.

  • The Looming Pension Crisis

    Nov 8, 2017

    California leads the nation in pension underfunding. The state government has $464.4 billion in unfunded liabilities — the difference between resources that will be available in the state's pension fund and what will be owed to retiring employees. And as dire as the problem is now, it could double over the next 12 years.

  • RAND Behavioral Finance Forum 2017

    Oct 24, 2017

    The RAND Behavioral Finance Forum brings together academic, financial, and government leaders to share cutting-edge behavioral research in financial decisionmaking. The 2017 annual conference was on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, at The Pew Charitable Trusts in Washington, D.C.

  • Keeping Americans on the Job in a Changing Economy

    Oct 20, 2017

    Despite calls to bring back U.S. coal mines and factories, the real issue isn't a lack of family-sustaining jobs, it's a mismatch between workers and available jobs.

  • Economic Impacts of the Syrian Conflict

    Oct 19, 2017

    Data from the World Bank and insights from economics literature are used to estimate the economic impact of destruction and infrastructure spending in agriculture, education, energy, health, housing, transportation, and water and sanitation in six war-torn cities.

  • Employers and Colleges Could Plan Better for Future Oil and Natural Gas Workforce

    Oct 17, 2017

    Advances in natural gas extraction should bring long-term economic benefits to Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. A survey of employers and educators can inform policy decisions on how best to expand and sustain the pool of skilled workers.

  • The State of the American Worker

    Sep 12, 2017

    In this Events @ RAND podcast, a panel of RAND's top analysts discuss emerging trends in the labor market and policy options to address inequality and jobs of the future.

  • Why More Young Workers Are Relying on Financial Help from Parents

    Aug 31, 2017

    As today's young adults grapple with a difficult job market, high tuition costs, and rapidly rising rents, parents are increasingly providing financial support and other forms of assistance.

  • Many Americans Face Bullying, Harassment, and Abuse at Work, but Bosses Can Help

    Aug 30, 2017

    Workers are experiencing high levels of hostile behaviors at work. Nearly one in five American workers have been subjected to some form of verbal abuse, unwanted sexual attention, threats, or humiliating behavior at work, with younger non-college educated workers bearing the most risk.