Choice Modelling and Behavioural Research

In many fields, choices made by individuals will determine the effectiveness of policy. So understanding what drives people's choices is critical for developing successful policy. Discrete choice modelling provides an analytical framework to examine key drivers of individuals’ choices. It also provides a valuable method for measuring the values people place on non-market goods and services.

RAND Europe provides expertise in using discrete choice modelling methods. We develop our models using revealed preference and stated preference data, depending on the policy question.

Featured Research

  • British money surrounded by pills, tablets and capsules

    Exploring NHS and Social Care Funding Options

    Research on different health and social care funding models assessed the popularity of different funding approaches among the UK public. Previous research examined other countries' funding schemes and found there is no single, commonly preferred solution to achieving sustainable revenues.

Selected Research

  • The winding road to Brexit

    British people prefer a soft Brexit, if any

    A longitudinal study of British people finds they reject a no-deal scenario even more firmly than in 2017, and even Leave voters are shifting to a ‘softer’ Brexit. Membership in the European Economic Area remains the most popular option.

  • Traffic on the streets of London

    Developing a New Transport Demand Model for the London Area

    With rising populations in London leading to higher demand on road and transport networks, Transport for London asked researchers to develop a new strategic travel model for London, which will be used to develop strategic land use and transport policy scenarios to assist with future investment in London’s transport systems.

  • Global technology, innovation, and growth concept drawing

    Econometric modelling support links research and innovation to jobs and growth

    RAND Europe researchers assessed research and innovation reforms in EU countries to improve the modelling of policy impacts within the European Commission's QUEST III macroeconomic model.

  • Rush hour on the A38(M) urban motorway at Aston, Birmingham, UK.

    A review of induced travel demand

    Through an extensive literature review, researchers found evidence that road capacity improvements result in induced travel demand, but most of the evidence came from large metropolitan areas outside the UK. More evidence from local studies would be helpful to ensure induced travel demand is properly accounted for in appraisal of capacity improvements to the UK's Strategic Road Network.

  • A New Transport Model for South East Wales

    RAND Europe researchers developed models capable of predicting levels of transport demand in South East Wales in response to a range of different policy options and in light of demographic changes.

  • Container ships in a port at sunset

    Improved connectivity would benefit China's BRI

    Trade routes developed as part of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) aim to promote regional cooperation in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Improving multimodal transport infrastructure and connectivity in the BRI region would likely benefit all partners, and rail improvements would have the greatest impact.

  • H.C. Andersens Boulevard - January Evening in Copenhagen

    Quantifying travellers’ willingness to pay for a tolled tunnel in central Copenhagen

    Stated choice experiments helped researchers quantify the willingness of car and van travellers to pay to use a proposed new tunnel to cross to and from Amager in central Copenhagen. The results from this study will inform the Danish Road Directorate's proposed new infrastructure.

  • Hand press on free trial button on virtual screen

    'Free' trials mislead many EU consumers

    Labelling that includes a notice of the monthly fee to be charged after the end of a free trial can help to improve consumers' awareness of subscription traps, but many people overlook the information or are overconfident in their ability to remember to cancel.