Al Qaida

Featured

  • Ayman al-Zawahiri and Osama bin Laden in Jamkha, Afghanistan, May 1, 1998, photo by Balkis Press/ABACA/Reuters

    Commentary

    The Question of Succession in Al-Qaida

    Two months after the death of al Qaida leader Aymin al-Zawahiri, experts continue to debate potential contenders for his replacement while waiting for al-Qaeda to make an announcement. A dark horse contender with long ties to Osama bin Laden could upend predictions and threaten to revive one of history's most lethal terrorist groups.

    Sep 29, 2022

  • A Taliban fighter stands guard near the site where Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri was killed in a U.S. strike over the weekend, in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 2, 2022, photo by Stringer/Reuters

    Commentary

    After the al-Zawahiri Strike, the U.S. May Lack Capabilities in Afghanistan

    The U.S. drone strike that killed al Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri in Afghanistan took out one of the last remaining key figures behind the 9/11 terror attacks. But it also highlighted how little the United States got out of its 2020 bargain with the Taliban, and raised questions about the U.S. ability to adequately monitor the developing threat from this quarter going forward.

    Aug 3, 2022

Explore Al Qaida

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Going Local: The Key to Afghanistan

    The rapidly deteriorating situation in Afghanistan is now President Barack Obama's war, one he pledged to win during his election campaign. One of the biggest problems, however, is that since late 2001, the United States has crafted its Afghanistan strategy on a fatally flawed assumption, writes Seth Jones.

    Aug 8, 2009

  • Report

    Report

    Understanding Why Terrorist Operations Succeed or Fail

    Being able to understand why terrorist attacks have failed and to predict the likelihood of which will succeed is important for homeland security and counterterrorism planning. Literature on the topic suggests that the threat of any terrorist operation can best be evaluated by examining three key sets of characteristics.

    Jul 28, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Can Gitmo's Terrorists Be Rehabilitated?

    Before he closes Guantánamo, Obama must take a clear-eyed look at the record — and anticipate the next chapter of the fight against terrorism. What happens to terrorist suspects after they leave the detention center at Guantánamo Bay, asks Aidan Kirby Winn.

    Jun 29, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Wanted Dead or Alive? When We Don't Get Our Man

    On his first day in office, President Barack Obama issued a dramatic series of executive orders intended to symbolize a change of direction in America's

    Mar 3, 2009

  • News Release

    News Release

    United States, East Africa Allies Must Overcome Radical Islam to Reshape the Region's Security

    While al Qaeda is the primary terrorist/extremist threat in East Africa, the region suffers more broadly from a danger of radical Islamist groups and organizations that the United States and its allies must address to reshape the region's security environment.

    Feb 4, 2009

  • Report

    Report

    United States, East Africa Allies Must Overcome Radical Islam to Reshape the Region' Security

    While al Qaeda is the primary terrorist/extremist threat in East Africa, the region suffers more broadly from a danger of radical Islamist groups and organizations that the United States and its allies must address to reshape the region's security environment.

    Jan 1, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Know Your Enemy: From Iraq to Afghanistan

    As debate continues about how to fight a resurgent Al Qaeda and Taliban in Afghanistan and along the Pakistan border, leaders in Washington, Kabul and Islamabad seem lost about what to do next.... And most experts agree that an Al Qaeda-orchestrated attack on the U.S. homeland would likely be plotted from their sanctuary in these border areas, write Benjamin Bahney and Renny McPherson.

    Nov 9, 2008

  • News Release

    News Release

    New RAND Book Provides Unique View Into Jihadist Mind

    David Aaron, a veteran U.S. diplomat and director of the RAND Center for Middle East Public Policy, has compiled a wide range of writings by Islamic terrorists that offer an unusual window into their mentality. The book, "In Their Own Words: Voices of Jihad," is a virtual encyclopedia of jihadist rhetoric written by the terrorists themselves.

    Oct 15, 2008

  • Report

    Report

    New Book Provides Unique View Into Mind of Fanatical Jihadists

    David Aaron, a veteran U.S. diplomat and director of the RAND Center for Middle East Public Policy, has compiled a wide range of writings by Islamic terrorists that offer an unusual window into their mentality. The book,

    Sep 16, 2008

  • News Release

    News Release

    Book by Brian Michael Jenkins Explores Nuclear Terrorism; Allows Readers to Confront Crisis as a President Might

    In a new book, "Will Terrorists Go Nuclear?," leading terrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins explores both the risks and history of nuclear terrorism, and warns that terrorists may not even need to acquire such weapons to order to perpetrate "nuclear terror."

    Sep 10, 2008

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Probing Why Women Kill in Iraq

    A significant emphasis has been placed on female suicide bombers' tactical success, and efforts to determine why they kill focus on al-Qaida's recruitment of women. But little attention is paid to the personal motivation women have for killing themselves and dozens of innocents around them, writes Farhana Ali.

    Aug 7, 2008

  • Multimedia

    Multimedia

    Brian Michael Jenkins Discusses

    Offering insights into vital questions of national security, presidential decisionmaking, and terrorist motives, world-renowned terrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins examines how terrorists think about nuclear weapons and nuclear terror.

    Aug 6, 2008

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Stop the 'War' on Terror: Calling It a 'War' Is a Boon to Terrorist Recruiters

    Military might against Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups isn't working – and no wonder. After studying the record of 648 terrorist groups between 1968 and 2006, we've found that military force has rarely been effective in defeating this enemy. Indeed, the US reliance on military force – especially conventional military forces – has often been counterproductive, write Seth G. Jones and Martin C. Libicki.

    Aug 6, 2008

  • Report

    Report

    U.S. Should Rethink

    Current U.S. strategy against terrorist organization al Qaida has not been successful at limiting the group's capabilities. Since Sept. 11, 2001, al Qaida has been involved in more terrorist attacks than ever before, spanning an increasingly broader range of targets.

    Aug 3, 2008

  • Commercial Book

    Commercial Book

    Terrorism Expert Examines Intelligence on Al Qaida in

    According to a British intelligence report leaked to the press in 2007, al Qaida operatives are planning a large-scale attack

    Aug 2, 2008

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Dressed To Kill: Why the Number of Female Suicide Bombers is Rising in Iraq

    Muslim female suicide bombers are on the rise.... But for those of us who have studied the phenomenon, the assaults should not come as a surprise, writes Farhana Ali.

    Jul 30, 2008

  • News Release

    News Release

    U.S. Should Rethink

    Current U.S. strategy against the terrorist group al Qaida has not been successful in significantly undermining the group's capabilities.

    Jul 29, 2008

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Colonel Cardinal's Iceberg Theory

    As we continue to pour invaluable resources into our sixth year in Iraq, and the U.S. public and politicians wonder what we should do next, now may be a good time to revisit the overarching theory of our campaign plan in the Pacific: Colonel Cardinal's Iceberg Theory, writes Dick Hoffmann.

    Jul 29, 2008

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    How Terrorist Groups End: Implications for Countering al Qa'ida

    This research brief describes an analysis of how terrorist groups end. The evidence since 1968 indicates that most groups have ceased to exist as a result of police and intelligence actions or of political accommodations, not military efforts.

    Jun 30, 2008

  • News Release

    News Release

    RAND Report Shows Little Evidence of a Coherent al Qaeda Strategy for U.S. Attack

    February 28, 2007 News Release: RAND Report Shows Little Evidence of a Coherent al Qaeda Strategy for U.S. Attack.

    Feb 28, 2007