Communities

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  • A man walks through floodwaters to survey damage from Hurricane Sandy in the New Dorp Beach neighborhood of Staten Island, New York, November 1, 2012, photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters

    Essay

    How Citizen Scientists Are Protecting Their Communities

    Aug 29, 2019

    After Superstorm Sandy, residents of Brooklyn's Sunset Park neighborhood cleaned up debris, pumped out basements, and teamed up with researchers to find out what was in the floodwater. They established safety protocols to help local businesses prevent their chemicals from escaping and wrote a guide to help other communities.

  • Kathryn Derose at St. Augustine by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Santa Monica, California

    Essay

    Faith-Based Organizations Promote Well-Being in Underserved Communities

    Jan 4, 2019

    Kathryn Derose, a senior policy researcher at RAND and an Episcopal deacon, works with Latino and African-American churches to address health issues in their communities. Her research has shown the power of the pulpit to fight health disparities, counter stigma, and encourage healthy living.

Explore Communities

  • Multimedia

    How Truth Decay Happens

    “Truth Decay”—the shrinking role of facts and analysis in American public life—threatens democracy, policymaking, and civic discourse. RAND is studying this phenomenon to help understand what drives it and how to address it.

    May 16, 2018

  • Vial and syringe providing immunization from Truth Decay

    Article

    How to Increase Immunity to Truth Decay

    Americans have always held differing views about policy issues. But more and more, they disagree about basic facts. This is a symptom of what RAND calls “Truth Decay,” and it's doing severe damage to democracy in the United States.

    May 16, 2018

  • Michael Rich discussing RAND's "Truth Decay" research

    Multimedia

    Truth Decay: A Narrated Video

    "Truth Decay" is the diminishing role of facts and analysis in American public life. RAND is studying the causes and consequences of this phenomenon, and how they are interrelated. We invite other research organizations and individuals to join us in finding potential solutions and responses.

    May 16, 2018

  • Collage of public policy subject matter

    Brochure

    RAND's Most Influential Research from 70 Years Working in the Public Interest

    Over its 70-year history, RAND has continuously demonstrated that rigorous research and analysis can help address some of the world's most challenging problems.

    May 14, 2018

  • A mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicle was used to extract people day and night from flooded areas in Florence County, North Carolina

    Report

    DoD's Excess Property Program Works, but Perceptions About Militarized Police Persist

    The Department of Defense provides excess equipment—everything from desks to rifles to airplanes—at little or no cost to law enforcement agencies across America. This program is efficient and effective, but there are perceptions that it contributes to the militarization of police.

    May 14, 2018

  • A young mother and her daughter walk through a park

    Report

    How Can Parks Help Increase Physical Activity?

    Public neighborhood parks play an important role in providing venues for physical activity in urban areas. But they tend to be underutilized, especially for moderate to vigorous exercise.

    May 7, 2018

  • Journal Article

    Evaluating Community Partnerships Addressing Community Resilience in Los Angeles, California

    This study measured a key characteristic of community resilience: the growth of organizational networks and partnerships over time. Information from this research may be useful to local health departments interested in applying a community resilience framework to disaster preparedness.

    May 4, 2018

  • Grand opening of Shop 'n' Save in the Hill District, Pittsburgh, PA

    Research Brief

    Community Development Can Improve Health

    Community improvements—a new supermarket and new housing—were associated with health and economic gains among the residents of an underserved, primarily African-American neighborhood in Pittsburgh.

    May 1, 2018

  • Report

    Moving to the Unclassified: How the Intelligence Community Can Work from Unclassified Facilities

    This report provides analysis and recommendations for intelligence agencies on how to conduct work outside classified facilities by identifying policy, legal, technology, security, financial, and cultural considerations.

    Apr 23, 2018

  • The U.S. embassy in Moscow, Russia, March 27, 2018

    Commentary

    Moscow Is Going Too Far

    Russia has become more daring with the West with its retaliatory expulsions and may face a high price. An angered West could turn from expulsions to economic countermeasures.

    Apr 3, 2018

  • Emergency services staff work next to a children's play area near the bench where former Russian intelligence officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found poisoned in Salisbury, UK, March 13, 2018

    Commentary

    Russian Nerve Agent from Skripal Attack a Deadly Game-Changer

    The use of Novichok in last week's attack against Russian ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia demands global condemnation and an insistence that Russia account for how the nerve agent came to be used at all, much less on foreign soil.

    Mar 19, 2018

  • Vaccinations at a community clinic

    Commentary

    Open Science and a Culture of Health: You Two Should Talk

    By working together, the Culture of Health and Open Science movements could increase their potential to accelerate the use of scientific evidence to address impediments to population health and collective well-being.

    Mar 7, 2018

  • Journal Article

    Trust and the Ethical Conduct of Community-Engaged Research

    Practitioners of community-engaged research may strengthen public trust in science by gradually expanding the pool of community collaborators they work with.

    Feb 14, 2018

  • Senior Airman John J. Kosequat, a pararescueman with the 103rd Rescue Squadron of the 106th Rescue Wing assigned to the New York Air National Guard, pushes an elderly man toward the HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter in Houston area, August 30, 2017. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Daniel H. Farrell)

    Research Brief

    Boosting Disaster Resilience Among Older Adults

    Older adults are particularly vulnerable to natural disasters. Collaborations between public health departments and organizations that promote aging in place could improve disaster resilience among older populations.

    Jan 26, 2018

  • Journal Article

    Towards More Nuanced Classification of NGOs and Their Services to Improve Integrated Planning Across Disaster Phases

    Categorizing NGO disaster services as either "core"-critical to fulfilling an organizational mission-or "adaptive"-based on community needs during a disaster-will strengthen resilience-building efforts.

    Jan 24, 2018

  • Older man and woman surveying flood damage

    Tool

    Building Older Adults' Resilience by Bridging Public Health and Aging-in-Place Efforts: Toolkit

    This toolkit contains information and activities that can bring together those involved in aging-in-place support and those involved in disaster resilience efforts to improve the resilience of older adults to natural and human-caused disasters.

    Jan 23, 2018

  • An attendee at a community meeting reads materials about aging in place in West Hollywood, California, May 9, 2015

    Report

    Improving Older Adults' Disaster Resilience

    Most organizations that promote aging in place do not place a high priority on promoting disaster preparedness. And the resilience activities of public health departments are not focused on older adults. Tailoring existing activities to the needs of older adults could improve their disaster preparedness and resilience.

    Jan 23, 2018

  • Multimedia

    Exploring "Truth Decay"

    In this Call with the Experts, RAND president and CEO Michael Rich and political scientist Jennifer Kavanagh discuss the causes and consequences of Truth Decay, and how they compare with previous eras in U.S. history.

    Jan 17, 2018

  • Truth Decay title on public space with people and information

    Project

    Truth Decay: Fighting for Facts and Analysis

    RAND is studying “Truth Decay”—the diminishing reliance on facts and analysis in American public life. Truth Decay presents a threat to both evidence-based policymaking and democracy. RAND invites fellow researchers and engaged stakeholders to join our efforts to find solutions.

    Jan 16, 2018

  • News Release

    Declining Trust in Facts, Institutions Imposes Real-World Costs on U.S. Society

    Americans' reliance on facts to discuss public issues has declined significantly in the past two decades, leading to political paralysis and collapse of civil discourse. This phenomenon, referred to as “Truth Decay,” is defined by increasing disagreement about facts, a blurring between opinion and fact, an increase in the relative volume of opinion and personal experience over fact, and declining trust in formerly respected sources of factual information.

    Jan 16, 2018