Education and Literacy

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RAND research on early childhood, K-12, and higher education covers issues such as assessment and accountability, choice-based and standards-based reform, school leadership, teacher effectiveness, technology, and vocational training. RAND also explores life skills, such as media, health, and financial literacy, as well as how time spent outside the classroom impacts student outcomes.

  • Stressed-looking male teacher leaning against a desk with one hand on his forehead, photo by SolStock/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Educators' Poor Morale Matters, Even If They Don't Quit. Here's Why

    Aug 11, 2022

    State and district education leaders can take steps now to reduce teacher principal stress this fall in two ways: Recognize that job-related stress is systemic and that educators closer to the classroom may experience more of it, and talk with teachers and principals about the sources of stress in their job, and what could alleviate them.

  • Students making their way through a hallway at Ridgeview STEM Junior High in Pickerington, Ohio, December 21, 2021, photo by Shane Flanigan/USA Today via Reuters

    Report

    School Districts Still Struggled in Year Three of the Pandemic

    Jul 19, 2022

    Ninety percent of school districts changed operations in 2021–2022 because of teacher shortages. They increased substitute teacher pay and their number of staff above prepandemic levels. They also struggled with political polarization around critical race theory, student and staff mental health, and student learning loss.

Explore Education and Literacy

  • School cafeteria workers serving healthy lunches to children, photo by SDI Productions/Getty Images

    News Release

    Strengthening School Lunch Nutritional Standards May Help Improve Obesity Outlook for Low-Income Children

    Regulations that strengthened the nutritional requirements for school lunches were associated with a decline in signs of obesity among school children in kindergarten through 5th grade who participated in free or reduced-price lunch programs.

    May 5, 2022

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Building a Validity Argument for an Automated Writing Evaluation System (eRevise) as a Formative Assessment

    We present a validity argument for an AWE system—termed eRevise —that targets elementary students' text-based argumentative writing skills, specifically their ability to use text evidence.

    May 4, 2022

  • Man thinking at his laptop, photo by Shannon Fagan/Getty Images

    Essay

    How to Avoid Extremism on Social Media

    Extremist groups have been trolling the internet for decades, and they have learned to temper their words and disguise their intentions. A new scorecard can help users—or parents, or advertisers, or the social media companies themselves—understand when they might be interacting with extremist content.

    May 3, 2022

  • Inmate Marvin Worthy uses his JPay tablet device inside the East Jersey State Prison in Rahway, New Jersey, July 12, 2018, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Report

    Leveraging Technology to Support Prisoner Reentry

    How can technology help ease the transition from jails or prisons back into the community—and ensure better outcomes for individuals who have been incarcerated?

    May 3, 2022

  • A still frame from a short film created by artist-in-residence V+J. The video summarizes RAND’s 2021 paper on geoengineering as a tool to address global warming.

    Project

    The Risks of Geoengineering

    Geoengineering—the intentional manipulation of the climate—could help curb global warming, but it could also have world-altering consequences. In a new animated video, RAND artists-in-residence Juan Delcan and Valentina Izaguirre take a lighthearted look at this serious issue.

    Apr 27, 2022

  • The U.S. Capitol at sunset on the eve of the first anniversary of the January 6, 2021 attack on the building, in Washington, January 5, 2022, photo by Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

    Testimony

    Extremist Use of Online Spaces

    Extremist content can be found in all corners of the internet. How do the characteristics of online spaces contribute to individual radicalization? And how may the internet have helped foster conditions that contributed to the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol?

    Apr 27, 2022

  • A senior couple standing in their home in front of a large window. The man has his arm around the shoulder of the woman as they talk. Photo by FG Trade / Getty Images

    Journal Article

    Pathways to Retirement Among Dual Earning Couples

    This paper examines the transition from full-time work to fully retired among dual earning couples, which we call joint retirement trajectories. We analyze 12 waves of the Health and Retirement Study to map out the distribution of potential pathways that couples undertake when retiring.

    Apr 21, 2022

  • Teacher helping student in classroom

    Multimedia

    A Snapshot of Anti-Bias Education in U.S. K–12 Schools

    In this webinar, RAND researchers share data from a national teacher survey administered in spring 2021 concerning the extent to which public school teachers report addressing anti-bias education in their K-12 classrooms. Discussants from organizations that support high-quality teaching and learning reflect on the findings and their implications for helping all students in public schools succeed.

    Apr 18, 2022

  • Blog

    Russian Mercenaries, Online Extremism, the Commercial Space Market: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on Russia's use of mercenaries, understanding how extremist movements operate online, trends in the commercial space market, and more.

    Apr 15, 2022

  • Teenage boy doing schoolwork at home

    Multimedia

    The Pandemic’s Effect on College and Career Readiness Supports

    RAND policy researcher Christine Mulhern describes findings from her recent study that examined how college and career readiness supports changed during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Apr 14, 2022

  • African American medical student in the front of a classroom holding a pencil, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    Report

    Key Factors in Designing the Health System–Community Pathways Program for African American/Black Children and Young Adults

    This report describes the development of key factors in framework design for the Health System-Community Pathways Program, which aims to increase representation of African American/Black communities in the U.S. health care system workforce.

    Apr 14, 2022

  • Illustration of online extremists by Jessica Arana/RAND Corporation from Sean Rayford/Alamy; dem10/Getty Images; sestovic/Getty Images; Dilok Klaisataporn/Getty Images; Comstock/Getty Images

    Report

    How Extremism Operates Online

    Extremist groups use internet-based tools for financing, networking and coordination, recruitment and radicalization, inter- and intra-group knowledge transfer, and mobilization to action. How do internet users engage with these efforts? And can the internet be leveraged to counter extremism?

    Apr 12, 2022

  • Blog

    Employing Insurgency in Ukraine, U.S. Hospital Prices, Reaching the Middle Class: RAND Weekly Recap

    This week, we discuss the potential value of an insurgent campaign in Ukraine; addressing L.A.’s housing crisis; lessons from the 2017 battle for Raqqa; a look at U.S. hospital prices; Americans’ options for reaching the middle class; and how to help single mothers get out of poverty.

    Apr 8, 2022

  • Female teacher helping students training to be electricians, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Commentary

    If College Isn't the Pathway to the Middle Class It Once Was—What Is?

    Is college still the best path to the middle class? It's complicated. College credentials still do lead many to increased earnings, but the rapid increases in college costs, coupled with a strong labor market, have made the payoff for a college degree no longer a sure thing.

    Apr 5, 2022

  • Blog

    Helping Ukrainian Refugees, Truth Decay, Algorithmic Inequity: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how to help Ukrainian refugees, the link between cognitive processes and Truth Decay, tracking wastewater to understand the spread of COVID-19, and more.

    Apr 1, 2022

  • Multiracial group of children raising their hands in a classroom with a smiling Black woman teacher, photo by kali9/Getty Images

    Commentary

    How to Make Sure Your Summer Learning Program Is Effective

    In the best of times, it is no small feat to put together a quality summer learning program. Given that districts are focusing not only on academic recovery from COVID learning loss, but on retaining teachers, supporting students' and teachers' mental health, and addressing increases in misbehavior, they need immediate, digestible guidance for summer programming.

    Mar 30, 2022

  • Report

    Report

    Learning Creates Australia: Evaluation of the Learner's Journey Social Lab

    In this report, the authors evaluate 'The Learner's Journey', a social lab designed by Learning Creates Australia to explore ways to assess and accredit learning that better reflect the diverse knowledge sets, skills and dispositions of students.

    Mar 30, 2022

  • An illustration depicting the difference between light and darkness, image by Alyson Youngblood/RAND Corporation

    Q&A

    What You Can Do to Help Stop Truth Decay

    Truth Decay, the diminishing role of facts in American public life, isn't a problem that any one person can fix. But there are simple steps that individuals can take to help counter it.

    Mar 29, 2022

  • A human face outline and painted pattern composition evoking human relationships, mind, psychology, and creativity, image by Andrew Ostrovsky/Adobe Stock

    Report

    How Reasoning and Cognitive Biases Affect the Ability to Resist Truth Decay

    Truth Decay is the diminishing role of facts in American public life. What role do human reasoning processes and cognitive biases play in this phenomenon? And how can these factors affect an individual's resistance or susceptibility to Truth Decay?

    Mar 29, 2022

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Optimal Allocation of Seats in the Presence of Peer Effects: Evidence from a Job Training Program

    We model optimal treatment assignment in programs with a limited number of seats and study how the presence of peer effects impact the optimal allocation rule and us data from an RCT to show there are peer effects in the job training context.

    Mar 29, 2022