Educational Equity

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Educational equity is fair and just access to the support and resources necessary to achieve a student's full academic and social potential. RAND research has examined the benefits of and access to early childhood education; education inequities that intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic; teaching students with disabilities; anti-bias education in U.S. schools; and the education challenges that immigrants and refugees face.

  • Essay

    Stackable Credentials: Making College Work for More Students

    In some fields, stackable credentials offer a promising strategy for reshaping postsecondary education and training for underserved students. Used effectively, stackable programs can provide low-income students with a path to the middle class.

    Jan 11, 2024

  • Report

    High Schools Offer Uneven Access to Math Courses and College Preparation

    High school math experiences are important predictors of college and career readiness. But many students—particularly those who are Black, Hispanic, or from low-income households—do not have access to advanced mathematics courses. What can schools do to make math learning more equitable?

    Feb 27, 2024

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  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Teach for America Gets Mostly High Marks from Principal Survey

    The results of the Teach For America (TFA) 2015 National Principal Survey show the context in which TFA corps members work, how principals perceive corps members, and how principals perceive their interactions with TFA.

    Sep 24, 2015

  • A teacher helping a student in class

    Report

    Principals Express Satisfaction with Teach For America Teachers

    A majority of school principals are satisfied with teachers provided to their campuses through the Teach For America (TFA) program. Principals with more experience rated TFA corps members more highly. Principals who are TFA alumni, along with those at charter schools, were similarly satisfied overall but rated corps members' abilities lower in specific areas.

    Sep 24, 2015

  • Children raise their hands in a classroom

    Commentary

    How School Choice Could Disadvantage Low-Income Students

    The flexibility to allow Title I-A funds to follow students across schools has a certain appeal. But it could have negative consequences for some of the poorest students.

    Sep 1, 2015

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Life around Cambridge: Results from the Cambridge Ahead Quality of Life survey

    Through an employee survey, we found that making the Cambridge area a better place to live requires a rounded approach. Housing and traffic were the greatest concerns, while leisure, education and health were associated with local area satisfaction.

    Aug 10, 2015

  • Two college students sitting outside using a laptop

    Commentary

    Should Undocumented Immigrant Youth Pay In-State Tuition to Attend College?

    Undocumented children are entitled to free primary and secondary public education everywhere in the United States, regardless of their legal status. But when they finish high school, their options for college vary depending on the state in which they live.

    Jul 28, 2015

  • News Release

    News Release

    Eliminating Racial and Socioeconomic Performance Gaps for Pennsylvania Students Could Have Boosted Economy by $44 ...

    Eliminating race-ethnic and socioeconomic performance gaps for public school students in Pennsylvania could have boosted the state's gross domestic product by as much as $44 billion after 10 years.

    Jul 13, 2015

  • Pupils raising their hands during class

    Report

    The Economic Impact of Achievement Gaps in PA Public Schools

    Although Pennsylvania ranks high among U.S. states in average student performance, the achievement gaps between students classified by race-ethnicity, economic status, and parent education are among the widest nationally. Race-ethnic academic achievement gaps amount to an estimated annual cost of $1 billion to $3 billion in lost earnings.

    Jul 13, 2015

  • Students sitting outside under a tree with their teacher

    Blog

    Summer Learning Day: Stopping the Summer Slide

    RAND is conducting the first-ever assessment of large-scale, voluntary, district-run, summer learning programs serving low-income elementary students. The results may help districts, educators, and policymakers make better decisions about funding and implementing programs to stop summer learning loss.

    Jun 19, 2015

  • Report

    Report

    Satisfaction with life and local area among people who work in the Cambridge area: Results from the Cambridge Ahead Quality of Life Survey

    Through an employee survey, we found that making the Cambridge area a better place to live requires a rounded approach. Housing and traffic were the greatest concerns, while leisure, education and health were associated with local area satisfaction.

    May 19, 2015

  • Grinnell College president Raynard Kington

    Blog

    Scientific Workforce Diversity: A Conversation with Raynard Kington

    Grinnell College president and RAND alumnus Raynard Kington discusses the need for—and reality of—diversity in the biomedical scientific workforce.

    Apr 28, 2015

  • Teachers and students on a science class field trip in a greenhouse

    Research Brief

    First Outcomes from the National Summer Learning Study

    Five urban school districts are offering voluntary summer learning programs free of charge to struggling elementary students as part of a project to determine whether these kinds of programs improve low-income student outcomes.

    Feb 13, 2015

  • Masked protesters

    Report

    Individual Empowerment: Global Societal Trends to 2030

    Human development, grassroots movements, and access to the internet and social media are likely to empower citizens in Europe and beyond, forming a significant societal challenge for the EU in the coming decades.

    Feb 12, 2015

  • A toddler holds an electronic tablet

    Essay

    Tech for Tots: Learning to Use the Power of Technology to Enrich Kids' Lives

    When it comes to youngsters and technology use, how much is too much? How young is too young? RAND is on the case, to help prepare children for success in school and life.

    Jan 20, 2015

  • A college student reviewing her notes

    Commentary

    America's College Promise: Meeting the Higher Education Challenge

    President Obama's proposal to cover the costs of two years of community college offers hope to many American students, but two key challenges should be addressed: meeting the needs of underprepared students and devising a system to smooth the transfer of credits from one institution to another.

    Jan 19, 2015

  • A group of children study the globe with their teacher

    Journal Article

    Is It Possible to Distinguish Good Teaching from Classroom Composition?

    Measuring disadvantaged students' access to effective teachers requires examining the relationship between teachers' value-added estimates and the characteristics of their students. Research simulations investigate this relationship and may also help inform analysts' choices for the appropriate value-added models.

    Jan 19, 2015

  • College students taking notes in a classroom

    Commentary

    Cost of College in the United States

    For middle- to lower-income families in the U.S., in particular, the costs associated with attending a four-year university are becoming nearly impossible to bear. More and more students are ending up with significant debt after graduating from college, putting financial pressure on them at the outset of their professional careers.

    Jan 16, 2015

  • University building with columns

    Commentary

    College Ratings and Affordable Education

    There are reasons to believe American students from the middle- and lower-income tiers aren't making affordable college choices. Can a new ratings system help them make better, more affordable decisions?

    Dec 24, 2014

  • Six children standing in front of a chalkboard during a math lesson

    Report

    Students Who Attended Summer Learning Programs Gained an Advantage in Math

    Summer learning loss disproportionately affects low-income students and therefore likely contributes to the achievement gap between these students and their higher-income peers. Students who attended voluntary, school district-led summer learning programs in five urban areas began the academic year with stronger math skills than their peers who did not attend.

    Dec 16, 2014

  • A teacher helps a girl use a digital tablet

    Commentary

    Helping Teachers Overcome Technology Barriers in Early Childhood Education

    When it comes to helping children appreciate the benefits of using technology in a classroom setting, early childhood education providers play a critical role integrating that technology appropriately, intentionally, and productively. But these educators face myriad barriers to fulfilling these roles.

    Nov 21, 2014

  • Father and son using an electronic tablet on bunk beds

    Report

    Improving Family Engagement in Early Childhood Education Through Technology

    Technology may afford new opportunities to improve early childhood education outcomes by empowering families to become better educators at home, and strengthening the connection and communication between school and home.

    Nov 17, 2014

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