Egypt

  • Crowd going to Tahrir square to join the June 30 protests against the Muslim brotherhood and President Morsi

    Commentary

    The Egyptian Military's Playbook

    The Egyptian military, still bruised from its last stint in power, is likely to proceed with caution this time around. If it does intervene, it will likely seek some acquiescence from the Islamists and will want to quickly form an inclusive caretaker government.

    Jul 2, 2013

  • Egyptians protesting in Tahrir Square in March 2013

    Commentary

    Egypt's Self-Fulfilling Prophesy

    Rebel, or Tamarud, is a petition drive aimed at ousting President Morsi by collecting more signatures calling for his resignation than the number of votes he received in the 2012 elections. On June 30, the organizers will take to the streets in a rally that is likely to touch off clashes with security forces and Morsi's supporters.

    Jun 28, 2013

  • anti-Morsi protest in downtown Cairo

    Blog

    Luxor Governor's Resignation Highlights Growing Divide in Egypt

    The governor of the Egyptian city of Luxor, Mohamed El-Khayat, resigned amid protests last week, just days after being appointed to the post by President Mohamed Morsi. His selection was controversial due to his affiliation with an Islamist terror group that in 1997 killed 62 people in Luxor, many of them tourists.

    Jun 25, 2013

  • A man inks his finger after voting in Ciaro, Egypt.

    Blog

    New RAND Study Examines Voting Patterns in Post-Mubarak Egypt

    While much has been written on the electoral strength of Islamists in Egypt, most of the analysis has been done at the national level, ignoring regional divides within the country. A new report identifies the areas where Islamist parties run strongest, and the areas where non-Islamists are most competitive.

    Mar 22, 2013

  • Report

    Voting Patterns in Post-Mubarak Egypt

    An analysis of regional voting trends in Egypt—where Islamist parties run strongest, and where non-Islamists are most competitive—indicates that Egypt is headed toward a much more competitive political environment in which Islamists will be increasingly challenged to maintain their electoral edge.

    Mar 22, 2013

  • On Dec. 4, 2012, Egyptians marched to the federal palace to reject the constitution referendum

    Commentary

    Egypt's Constitutional Referendum Was an Opportunity Lost

    The Egyptian process left no room for broad deliberation of the constitutional issues, or even for educating citizens about the text of the document on which they were asked to vote, writes Laurel Miller.

    Dec 21, 2012

  • Egyptians protest against the draft constitution and the constitutional decree announced by President Mohamed Morsi

    Commentary

    Political Impasse in Egypt

    If there ever was a honeymoon in Egypt's post-Mubarak politics, it is long over. The two main ideological camps—Islamists and secular-liberals—have shown a willingness to cooperate only when brought together by a common foe, writes Jeffrey Martini.

    Dec 13, 2012

  • Anti-Mursi protesters chant anti-government slogans in Tahrir Square in Cairo November 27, 2012

    Commentary

    Don't Give Up on Egypt's Political Transition Just Yet

    Many transitions around the world in recent decades have been just as chaotic, yet 180-degree returns to autocracy have been exceedingly rare, writes Laurel Miller.

    Nov 28, 2012

  • Morsi's presidential campaign poster

    Commentary

    Muslim Brotherhood Failing to Learn from Mistakes

    The Muslim Brotherhood is falling into the same trap of overreach exhibited by the Egyptian military when the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) held the reins of authority during the first 16 months of the transition, writes Jeffrey Martini.

    Oct 18, 2012

  • Report

    Muslim Brotherhood Challenged by Generational Divides

    The Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamic political movement that headed the national government in Egypt until its ouster in the summer of 2013, faced a generational divide that posed significant challenges to the group as it worked to extend its role in Egyptian society.

    Oct 18, 2012

  • A woman wearing a headscarf

    Commentary

    Headscarves on Egyptian Newscasts Are a Victory for Tolerance

    Lifting the Egyptian ban on headscarves on TV newscasts can be seen as a positive development. It ends state discrimination against those who wish to show their faith outwardly.

    Sep 6, 2012

  • Celebrating that Mohamed Morsi has won the presidential elections - or/and that Shafik has lost

    Commentary

    How Does Arab Spring Compare to Third Wave Transitions?

    The changes underway in the Arab world may lead to various possible destinations that differ both from their points of departure and from liberal democracy, write Laurel Miller and Jeffrey Martini.

    Aug 17, 2012

  • Supporters celebrate Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi's decision to dismiss former defence minister and field marshall Hussein Tantawi, in Cairo August 13, 2012

    Commentary

    Changing of the Guard in Egypt

    Morsi's moves were certainly dramatic, and he may not be done. He has

    Aug 14, 2012

  • stack of Egyptian election ballots

    Report

    Arab Spring Revolutions Have Not Yet Created Democracies, but Democratization Is Possible

    The Arab world is the one region that has been left out of the global trend toward greater embrace of democracy, but a successful shift from authoritarian regimes to democratic governments is possible there.

    Jul 18, 2012

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Prospects for Democratization in the Arab World

    Daunting challenges lie ahead for countries undergoing political transitions in the Arab world. Researchers identify the challenges these countries face and suggest policy approaches that may help foster enduring democracies.

    Jul 18, 2012

  • News Release

    News Release

    Arab Spring Revolutions Have Not Yet Created Democracies, but Democratization Is Possible

    The Arab world is the one region that has been left out of the global trend toward greater embrace of democracy, but a successful shift from authoritarian regimes to democratic governments is possible there.

    Jul 17, 2012

  • Egypt's Islamist President-elect Mohamed Mursi waves to his supporters while surrounded by members of the presidential guard in Cairo's Tahrir Square, June 29, 2012

    Commentary

    Egypt's New President Has the Mandate—What about the Power?

    Mohamed Morsi's victory is a huge step in Egypt's political development, but his authorities were recently curtailed by the military and it is unclear how much power he will actually wield, writes Jeffrey Martini.

    Jun 25, 2012

  • A supporter of Muslim Brotherhood's presidential candidate Morsi during a rally at Tahrir Square in Cairo June 22, 2012

    Commentary

    The Egyptian Military Wins Again

    The Muslim Brotherhood now faces a choice. It can seat Mursi and continue to legitimate a post-Mubarak transition that seems designed to advance the narrow interests of Egypt's officer corps. Or it can return to the streets with the aim of unseating the military council, writes Jeff Martini.

    Jun 22, 2012

  • Egyptian man shouting and holding up a newspaper in Cairo on April 20, 2012

    Commentary

    Cairo's Candidate Shuffle

    Just as before the disqualifications, the fundamental decision voters face is about the scope and nature of the change Egypt will undergo in the coming years. And there are still candidates representing almost every position on that spectrum, writes Jeffrey Martini.

    Apr 19, 2012

  • A protester shouts during a demonstration outside the parliamentary building in Tunis, Tunisia, November 22, 2011, photo by Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters

    Commentary

    The Year of the Arab Spring

    The Arab Spring demonstrated that leaderless revolutions are difficult to repress or co-opt. Unfortunately, it is also true that leaderless revolts find it difficult to make transition to authority, writes Charles Ries.

    Dec 20, 2011